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Title: Innovative Courses that Broaden Awareness of CS Careers and Prepare Students for Technical Interviews
While undergraduate Computer Science (CS) degree programs typically prepare students for well-established roles (e.g. software developer, professor, and designer), several emergent CS career roles have gained prominence during the 21st century. CS majors (and students considering CS as a major) are often unaware of the wide range of careers available to job candidates with a CS background. This experience report describes seven innovative courses that broaden awareness of CS career roles and prepare students for technical interviews. Five courses prepared students for these career roles: Full-Stack Developer, Product Manager, ML or NLU Scientist, Technical Entrepreneur, and User Experience Designer/Developer/Researcher. The other two courses had traditional content but explicitly prepared students for technical interviews. These courses were co-developed by industry professionals and CS professors, and co-taught during a semester-long academic program. This paper highlights the replicable aspects of the program: the courses, teaching practices, and evaluation instruments (a teaching practices inventory and a data structures inventory).  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1834620 2137791
NSF-PAR ID:
10454888
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Editor(s):
Lu, B.; Alvin, C.
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of computing sciences in colleges
Volume:
38
Issue:
5
ISSN:
1937-4771
Page Range / eLocation ID:
54-64
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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