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Title: The Influence of the Substrate on the Functionality of Spin Crossover Molecular Materials
Spin crossover complexes are a route toward designing molecular devices with a facile readout due to the change in conductance that accompanies the change in spin state. Because substrate effects are important for any molecular device, there are increased efforts to characterize the influence of the substrate on the spin state transition. Several classes of spin crossover molecules deposited on different types of surface, including metallic and non-metallic substrates, are comprehensively reviewed here. While some non-metallic substrates like graphite seem to be promising from experimental measurements, theoretical and experimental studies indicate that 2D semiconductor surfaces will have minimum interaction with spin crossover molecules. Most metallic substrates, such as Au and Cu, tend to suppress changes in spin state and affect the spin state switching process due to the interaction at the molecule–substrate interface that lock spin crossover molecules in a particular spin state or mixed spin state. Of course, the influence of the substrate on a spin crossover thin film depends on the molecular film thickness and perhaps the method used to deposit the molecular film.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2003057
NSF-PAR ID:
10454923
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Molecules
Volume:
28
Issue:
9
ISSN:
1420-3049
Page Range / eLocation ID:
3735
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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