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Title: Partial Tidal Disruptions of Main-sequence Stars by Intermediate-mass Black Holes
Abstract We study close encounters of a 1 M ⊙ middle-age main-sequence star (modeled using MESA) with massive black holes through hydrodynamic simulations, and explore in particular the dependence of the outcomes on the black hole mass. We consider here black holes in the intermediate-mass range, M BH = 100–10 4 M ⊙ . Possible outcomes vary from a small tidal perturbation for weak encounters all the way to partial or full disruption for stronger encounters. We find that stronger encounters lead to increased mass loss at the first pericenter passage, in many cases ejecting the partially disrupted star on an unbound orbit. For encounters that initially produce a bound system, with only partial stripping of the star, the fraction of mass stripped from the star increases with each subsequent pericenter passage and a stellar remnant of finite mass is ultimately ejected in all cases. The critical penetration depth that separates bound and unbound remnants has a dependence on the black hole mass when M BH ≲ 10 3 M ⊙ . We also find that the number of successive close passages before ejection decreases as we go from the stellar-mass black hole to the intermediate-mass black hole regime. For instance, after an initial encounter right at the classical tidal disruption limit, a 1 M ⊙ star undergoes 16 (5) pericenter passages before ejection from a 10 M ⊙ (100 M ⊙ ) black hole. Observations of periodic flares from these repeated close passages could in principle indicate signatures of a partial tidal disruption event.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2108624
NSF-PAR ID:
10464002
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
948
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0004-637X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
89
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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