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Title: Communicating identity in the Urban STEM Collaboratory: toward a communication theory of STEM identities
Award ID(s):
1833987 1833817 1833983
NSF-PAR ID:
10464757
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
International Journal of Science Education, Part B
ISSN:
2154-8455
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 17
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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