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Title: Human-Centered Generative Design Framework: An Early Design Framework to Support Concept Creation and Evaluation
Award ID(s):
2207408
NSF-PAR ID:
10466551
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Taylor & Francis
Date Published:
Journal Name:
International Journal of Human–Computer Interaction
ISSN:
1044-7318
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 12
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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