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Title: Fully Inkjet‐Printed, 2D Materials‐Based Field‐Effect Transistor for Water Sensing
Abstract

Despite significant progress in solution‐processing of 2D materials, it remains challenging to reliably print high‐performance semiconducting channels that can be efficiently modulated in a field‐effect transistor (FET). Herein, electrochemically exfoliated MoS2nanosheets are inkjet‐printed into ultrathin semiconducting channels, resulting in high on/off current ratios up to 103. The reported printing strategy is reliable and general for thin film channel fabrication even in the presence of the ubiquitous coffee‐ring effect. Statistical modeling analysis on the printed pattern profiles suggests that a spaced parallel printing approach can overcome the coffee‐ring effect during inkjet printing, resulting in uniform 2D flake percolation networks. The uniformity of the printed features allows the MoS2channel to be hundreds of micrometers long, which easily accommodates the typical inkjet printing resolution of tens of micrometers, thereby enabling fully printed FETs. As a proof of concept, FET water sensors are demonstrated using printed MoS2as the FET channel, and printed graphene as the electrodes and the sensing area. After functionalization of the sensing area, the printed water sensor shows a selective response to Pb2+in water down to 2 ppb. This work paves the way for additive nanomanufacturing of FET‐based sensors and related devices using 2D nanomaterials.

 
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Award ID(s):
2037026
NSF-PAR ID:
10468758
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Advanced Materials Technologies
ISSN:
2365-709X
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    References

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    T. Wu, A. Alharbi, R. Kiani, D. Shahrjerdi,Adv. Mater.31, 1–12 (2019).

     
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