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Title: Discovery and Timing of Millisecond Pulsars with the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift-scan Survey
Abstract

We present the discovery and timing solutions of four millisecond pulsars (MSPs) discovered in the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift-Scan Pulsar Survey. Three of these pulsars are in binary systems, consisting of a redback (PSR J2055+1545), a black widow (PSR J1630+3550), and a neutron star–white dwarf binary (PSR J2116+1345). The fourth MSP, PSR J2212+2450, is isolated. We present the multiyear timing solutions as well as polarization properties across a range of radio frequencies for each pulsar. We perform a multiwavelength search for emission from these systems and find an optical counterpart for PSR J2055+1545 in Gaia DR3, as well as a gamma-ray counterpart for PSR J2116+1345 with the Fermi-LAT telescope. Despite the close colocation of PSR J2055+1545 with a Fermi source, we are unable to detect gamma-ray pulsations, likely due to the large orbital variability of the system. This work presents the first two binaries found by this survey with orbital periods shorter than a day; we expect to find more in the 40% of the survey data that have yet to be searched.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10469608
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
956
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0004-637X
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: Article No. 132
Size(s):
["Article No. 132"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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