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This content will become publicly available on September 25, 2024

Title: In Search of a Borderland: Material Culture Patterns on the Southern Limits of the North American Southwest
Recent research conducted in southern Sonora, Mexico provides an opportunity to revisit debates about interaction between Mesoamerica and the North American Southwest (NAS). In the borderland between these traditions, communities show few signs of cultural amalgamation, instead exhibiting either an avoidance of overt identity markers or an emphasis on more local connections. This pattern contrasts with most discussions of Mesoamerican influence on the NAS that focus on regionally atypical centers of foreign goods consumption or evidence of foreign religious traditions in distant localities. By recentering on local contexts where cultural amalgamation is expected but minimal, we raise important questions about why more distant groups found Mesoamerican societies to be worthy of emulation. The results suggest researchers should devote equal attention to cases in which distinct identities are erased or suppressed as they do to cases in which social boundaries are maintained or created anew.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1724445
NSF-PAR ID:
10470251
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Routledge
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Field Archaeology
ISSN:
0093-4690
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 17
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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