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Title: Developmental Articulatory and Acoustic Features for Six to Ten Year Old Children
In this paper, we study speech development in children using longitudinal acoustic and articulatory data. Data were collected yearly from grade 1 to grade 4 from four female and four male children. We analyze acoustic and articulatory properties of four corner vowels: /æ/, /i/, /u/, and /A/, each occurring in two different words (different surrounding contexts). Acoustic features include formant frequencies and subglottal resonances (SGRs). Articulatory features include tongue curvature degree (TCD) and tongue curvature position (TCP). Based on the analyses, we observe the emergence of sex-based differences starting from grade 2. Similar to adults, the SGRs divide the vowel space into high, low, front, and back regions at least as early as grade 2. On average, TCD is correlated with vowel height and TCP with vowel frontness. Children in our study used varied articulatory configurations to achieve similar acoustic targets.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2006979
NSF-PAR ID:
10470344
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
ISCA
Date Published:
Page Range / eLocation ID:
4598 to 4602
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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