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Title: Accountable Design for Individual, Societal, and Regulated Values in the UAV Domain
Software systems are increasingly expected to address a broad range of stakeholder values representing both personal and societal values as well as values ensconced as laws and regulations. Whereas laws and regulations must be fully addressed, other human values need to be carefully analyzed and prioritized within the context of candidate architectural designs. The majority of prior work has investigated requirements engineering techniques for either regulatory compliance or for human-values, we take an integrated approach which simultaneously considers laws and regulations as well as societal and personal human values throughout the system analysis, specification, and design process. We illustrate our approach through detailed examples drawn from a multi-drone system regulated by the USA Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) and operating in a domain rich with human and societal values. We then discuss requirements engineering challenges and solutions unique to identifying analyzing, and prioritizing human, societal, and regulatory requirements, and ultimately for designing accountable software systems.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2131515
NSF-PAR ID:
10471798
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
IEEE
Date Published:
Journal Name:
31st {IEEE} International Requirements Engineering Conference, {RE} 2023, Hannover, Germany, September 4-8, 2023
Page Range / eLocation ID:
287 to 292
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
["human values","traceability","regulations","design decisions","accountable design"]
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Hannover, Germany
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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