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Title: Nitrogen-enriched, Highly Pressurized Nebular Clouds Surrounding a Super Star Cluster at Cosmic Noon
Abstract

Strong lensing offers a precious opportunity for studying the formation and early evolution of super star clusters that are rare in our cosmic backyard. The Sunburst Arc, a lensed Cosmic Noon galaxy, hosts a young super star cluster with escaping Lyman continuum radiation. Analyzing archival Hubble Space Telescope images and emission line data from Very Large Telescope/MUSE and X-shooter, we construct a physical model for the cluster and its surrounding photoionized nebula. We confirm that the cluster is ≲4 Myr old, is extremely massiveM∼ 107M, and yet has a central component as compact as several parsecs, and we find a gas-phase metallicityZ= (0.22 ± 0.03)Z. The cluster is surrounded by ≳105Mof dense clouds that have been pressurized toP∼ 109K cm−3by perhaps stellar radiation at within 10 pc. These should have large neutral columnsNHI> 1022.8cm−2to survive rapid ejection by radiation pressure. The clouds are likely dusty as they show gas-phase depletion of silicon, and may be conducive to secondary star formation ifNHI> 1024cm−2or if they sink farther toward the cluster center. Detecting strong [Niii]λλ1750,1752, we infer heavy nitrogen enrichmentlog(N/O)=0.210.11+0.10. This requires efficiently retaining ≳500Mof nitrogen in the high-pressure clouds from massive stars heavier than 60Mup to 4 Myr. We suggest a physical origin of the high-pressure clouds from partial or complete condensation of slow massive star ejecta, which may have an important implication for the puzzle of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10472445
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
957
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0004-637X
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: Article No. 77
Size(s):
["Article No. 77"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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