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This content will become publicly available on June 9, 2024

Title: Constraints on the Hubble constant from supernova Refsdal’s reappearance

The gravitationally lensed supernova Refsdal appeared in multiple images produced through gravitational lensing by a massive foreground galaxy cluster. After the supernova appeared in 2014, lens models of the galaxy cluster predicted that an additional image of the supernova would appear in 2015, which was subsequently observed. We use the time delays between the images to perform a blinded measurement of the expansion rate of the Universe, quantified by the Hubble constant (H0). Using eight cluster lens models, we inferH0=64.84.3+4.4 kilometers per second per megaparsec. Using the two models most consistent with the observations, we findH0=66.63.3+4.1 kilometers per second per megaparsec. The observations are best reproduced by models that assign dark-matter halos to individual galaxies and the overall cluster.

 
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Award ID(s):
1906976 1908823
NSF-PAR ID:
10473650
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; more » ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; « less
Publisher / Repository:
Science
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
380
Issue:
6649
ISSN:
0036-8075
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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