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Title: A Comparison of Particle-in-cell and Hybrid Simulations of the Heliospheric Termination Shock
Abstract

We compare hybrid (kinetic proton, fluid electron) and particle-in-cell (kinetic proton, kinetic electron) simulations of the solar wind termination shock with parameters similar to those observed by Voyager 2 during its crossing. The steady-state results show excellent agreement between the downstream variations in the density, plasma velocity, and magnetic field. The quasi-perpendicular shock accelerates interstellar pickup ions to a maximum energy limited by the size of the computational domain, with somewhat higher fluxes and maximal energies observed in the particle-in-cell simulation, likely due to differences in the cross-shock electric field arising from electron kinetic-scale effects. The higher fluxes may help address recent discrepancies noted between observations and large-scale hybrid simulations.

 
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Award ID(s):
2148653
NSF-PAR ID:
10476372
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
959
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0004-637X
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: Article No. 4
Size(s):
Article No. 4
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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