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Title: Towards Enabling Complex Touch-based Human-Drone Interaction
In this paper, we introduce an innovative approach to multi-human robot interaction, leveraging the capabilities of omnicopters. These agile aerial vehicles are poised to revolutionize haptic feedback by offering complex sensations with 6 degrees of freedom (6DoF) movements. Unlike traditional systems, our envisioned method enables haptic rendering without the need for tilt, offering a more intuitive and seamless interaction experience. Furthermore, we propose using omnicopter swarms in human-robot interaction, these omnicopters can collaboratively emulate and render intricate objects in real-time. This swarm-based rendering not only expands the realm of tangible human-robot interactions but also holds potential in diverse applications, from immersive virtual environments to tactile guidance in physical tasks. Our vision outlines a future where robots and humans interact in more tangible and sophisticated ways, pushing the boundaries of current haptic technology.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2232382
NSF-PAR ID:
10477493
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Corporate Creator(s):
Editor(s):
Wilde N.; Alonso-Mora J.; Brown D.; Mattson C.; Sycara K.
Publisher / Repository:
Human Multi-Robot Interaction at the 2023 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2023)
Date Published:
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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