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This content will become publicly available on July 18, 2024

Title: A Typology for Learning: Examining How Academic Makerspaces Support Learning for Students
While advances have been made in studying engineering design learning in the classroom, to date, such advances have not addressed hands-on, real-world learning experiences in university makerspaces. Our particular interest was how such spaces support women engineers as designers, learners, makers, and community members. To investigate this, we initially completed two qualitative interview studies: (1) a three-series in-depth phenomenologically based interview methodology with five women students and (2) a targeted, single interview protocol with 15 women students. The in-depth interviews were analyzed using grounded theory techniques and coding methods as a means to develop a typology. To explore the broader applicability of the findings, 19 additional interviews (five women and five men at Big City U.; four women and five men at Comprehensive U.) were also completed. Overall, makerspaces are confirmed to help provide women students with a diverse skillset that engages design, manufacturing, cultural knowledge, failure, collaboration, confidence, resilience, communication management, and ingenuity.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1733708
NSF-PAR ID:
10478015
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
ASME
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Mechanical Design
Volume:
145
Issue:
9
ISSN:
1050-0472
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
["makerspaces","maker space","learning","typology","interviews","grounded theory"]
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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