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Title: Advances in step-based tutoring for linear circuit analysis and comprehensive evaluation
Step-based tutoring consists in breaking down complicated problem-solving procedures into individual steps whose inputs can be immediately evaluated to promote effective student learning. Here, recent progress on the extension of a step-based tutoring for linear circuit analysis to cover new topics requiring complex, multi-step solution procedures is described. These topics include first and second-order transient problems solved using classical differential equation approaches. Students use an interactive circuit editor to modify the circuit appropriately for each step of the analysis, followed by writing and solving equations using methods of their choice as appropriate. Initial work on Laplace transform-based circuit analysis is also discussed. Detailed feedback is supplied at each step along with fully worked examples, supporting introductory multiple-choice tutorials and YouTube videos, and a full record of the student's work is created in a PDF document for later study and review. Further, results of a comprehensive independent evaluation involving both quantitative and qualitative analysis and users across four participating institutions are discussed. Overall, students had very favorable experiences using the step-based system across Fall 2020 and Spring 2021. At least 48% of students in the Fall 2020 semester and 60% of students in the Spring 2021 semester agreed or strongly agreed with all survey questions about positive features of the system. Those who had used the step-based system and the commercial MasteringEngineering system preferred the former by 69% to 12% margins in surveys. Instructors were further surveyed and 86% would recommend the system to others.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1821628
NSF-PAR ID:
10479211
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
American Society for Engineering Education
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proc. Amer. Soc. Engrg. Educat. Ann. Conf.
Page Range / eLocation ID:
https://peer.asee.org/42086
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
Step-based tutoring computer-aided instruction linear circuit analysis
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Minneapolis, MN
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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