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Title: Data-VCG: A Data Preservation Game for Base Station-less Sensor Networks with Performance Guarantee
We design a data preservation game called Data-VCG for base station-less sensor networks ( BSNs ). In the BSN, sensor nodes do not have connected paths to a base station thus, sensory data must be preserved inside the network before uploading opportunities arise. Data-VCG incorporates data values into the classic Vickrey-Clark-Groves (VCG) mechanism, a generic truthful mechanism for achieving a socially-optimal solution. It motivates all the sensor nodes (i.e., source, storage, and transition) to voluntarily participate in the data preservation process while achieving minimum data preservation cost. We give a detailed analysis of the performance guarantee of the Data-VCG and show that under certain conditions, its worst-case budget imbalance is at most n−3 times the efficiency gain, where n is the number of sensor nodes in the network. We conduct extensive simulations to validate our results in both grids and randomly generated BSNs under different network dynamics.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2131309
NSF-PAR ID:
10483597
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
IEEE
Date Published:
Journal Name:
3rd International Workshop on Time-Sensitive and Deterministic Networking (TENSOR), IFIP Networking 2023.
ISSN:
1864-2284
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 6
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Barcelona, Spain
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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