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Title: Microbial gene expression in Guaymas Basin subsurface sediments responds to hydrothermal stress and energy limitation
Analyses of gene expression of subsurface bacteria and archaea provide insights into their physiological adaptations to in situ subsurface conditions. We examined patterns of expressed genes in hydrothermally heated subseafloor sediments with distinct geochemical and thermal regimes in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico. RNA recovery and cell counts declined with sediment depth, however, we obtained metatranscriptomes from eight sites at depths spanning between 0.8 and 101.9m below seafloor. We describe the metabolic potential of sediment microorganisms, and discuss expressed genes involved in tRNA, mRNA, and rRNA modifications that enable physiological flexibility of bacteria and archaea in the hydrothermal subsurface. Microbial taxa in hydrothermally influenced settings like Guaymas Basin may particularly depend on these catalytic RNA functions since they modulate the activity of cells under elevated temperatures and steep geochemical gradients. Expressed genes for DNA repair, protein maintenance and circadian rhythm were also identified. The concerted interaction of many of these genes may be crucial for microorganisms to survive and to thrive in the Guaymas Basin subsurface biosphere.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2046799
NSF-PAR ID:
10484772
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Springer Nature
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The ISME journal
Volume:
17
ISSN:
1751-7370
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1907-1919
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
["Deep Biosphere","hydrothermalism","metatranscriptomes","adaptation","survival"]
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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