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Title: Exchange-driven spin Hall effect in anisotropic ferromagnets
Crystallographic anisotropy of the spin-dependent conductivity tensor can be exploited to generate transverse spin-polarized current in a ferromagnetic film. This ferromagnetic spin Hall effect is analogous to the spin-splitting effect in altermagnets and does not require spin-orbit coupling. First-principles screening of 41 non-cubic ferromagnets revealed that many of them, when grown as a single crystal with tilted crystallographic axes, can exhibit large spin Hall angles comparable with the best available spin-orbit-driven spin Hall sources. Macroscopic spin Hall effect is possible for uniformly magnetized ferromagnetic films grown on some low-symmetry substrates with epitaxial relations that prevent cancellation of contributions from different orientation domains. Macroscopic response is also possible for any substrate if magnetocrystalline anisotropy is strong enough to lock the magnetization to the crystallographic axes in different orientation domains.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1916275 2324203
NSF-PAR ID:
10489994
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Publisher / Repository:
American Physical Society
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Physical Review B
Volume:
109
Issue:
5
ISSN:
2469-9950
Page Range / eLocation ID:
054409
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
["spin Hall effect","spin current","magnetic thin films","first-principles calculations"]
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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