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Title: Sub-parsec-scale jet-driven water maser with possible gravitational acceleration in the radio galaxy NGC 1052
Abstract

We report sub-parsec-scale observations of the 321 GHz H2O emission line in the radio galaxy NGC 1052. The H2O line emitter size is constrained in <0.6 mas distributed on the continuum core component. The brightness temperature exceeding 106 K and the intensity variation indicate certain evidence for maser emission. The maser spectrum consists of redshifted and blueshifted velocity components spanning ∼400 km s−1, separated by a local minimum around the systemic velocity of the galaxy. The spatial distribution of maser components shows a velocity gradient along the jet direction, implying that the population-inverted gas is driven by the jets interacting with the molecular torus. We identified a significant change of the maser spectra between two sessions separated by 14 days. The maser profile showed a radial velocity drift of 127 ± 13 km s−1 yr−1 implying inward gravitational acceleration at 5000 Schwarzschild radii. The results demonstrate the feasibility of future very long baseline interferometry observations to resolve the jet–torus interacting region.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10496440
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Oxford University Press
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan
Volume:
76
Issue:
3
ISSN:
0004-6264
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: p. 340-352
Size(s):
["p. 340-352"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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