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Title: Physics-Based Feedforward Control of Thermal History in Laser Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing
We developed and applied a model-based feedforward control approach to reduce temperature-induced flaw formation in the laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) additive manufacturing process. The feedforward control is built upon three basic steps. First, the thermal history of the part is rapidly predicted using a mesh-free graph theory model. Second, thermal history metrics are extracted from the model to identify regions of heat buildup, symptomatic of flaw formation. Third, process parameters are changed layer-by-layer based on insights from the thermal model. This technique was validated with two identical build plates (Inconel 718). Parts on the first build plate were made under manufacturer recommended nominal process parameters. Parts on the second build plate were made with model optimized process parameters. Results were validated with in-situ infrared thermography, and materials characterization techniques. Parts produced under controlled processing exhibited superior geometric accuracy and resolution, finer grain size, and increased microhardness.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2309483 1752069 2322322 1929172
NSF-PAR ID:
10497533
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Date Published:
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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