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Title: Electrochemical Bubble Delamination and Transfer of CVD Graphene from Copper to Si/SiO2 Utilizing Mechanical Assistance
High quality graphene can efficiently be grown on large surface areas of copper foil through chemical vapor deposition (CVD). To transfer CVD graphene onto a substrate for use in nanoscale photonic devices a process called electrochemical bubble delamination is utilized. During the delamination and transfer procedure the CVD graphene is at its most susceptible. Therefore, the incentive to develop a minimal-contact and replicable process is high. The use of a mechanical stage controlled by an actuator is a promising method of avoiding significant mechanical defects like folding or tearing and is capable of ensuring the film is delaminated at the right speed and from bottom to top. The quality of the transferred graphene is varied with regions of high-quality graphene up to 80x80µm while the typical transfer region has a large presence of gaps, cracks, and PMMA residues. It is evident that extending the mechanical assistance to other parts of the transfer process may be valuable, however, the occurrence of mechanical and chemical defects in the transferred graphene is still a limiting factor in the use of electrochemical bubble delamination.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2244146
NSF-PAR ID:
10497996
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Editor(s):
Chair: Petru Fodor, Department of
Publisher / Repository:
Bulletin of the American Physical Society
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Bulletin of the American Physical Society
Edition / Version:
L05.00001
ISSN:
0003-0503
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Cleveland State University Room: SI 149
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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