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Title: A probable Keplerian disk feeding an optically revealed massive young star
Abstract

The canonical picture of star formation involves disk-mediated accretion, with Keplerian accretion disks and associated bipolar jets primarily observed in nearby, low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs). Recently, rotating gaseous structures and Keplerian disks have been detected around several massive (M > 8 M) YSOs (MYSOs)1–4, including several disk-jet systems5–7. All the known MYSO systems are in the Milky Way, and all are embedded in their natal material. Here we report the detection of a rotating gaseous structure around an extragalactic MYSO in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The gas motion indicates that there is a radial flow of material falling from larger scales onto a central disk-like structure. The latter exhibits signs of Keplerian rotation, so that there is a rotating toroid feeding an accretion disk and thus the growth of the central star. The system is in almost all aspects comparable to Milky Way high-mass YSOs accreting gas from a Keplerian disk. The key difference between this source and its Galactic counterparts is that it is optically revealed rather than being deeply embedded in its natal material as is expected of such a massive young star. We suggest that this is the consequence of the star having formed in a low-metallicity and low-dust content environment. Thus, these results provide important constraints for models of the formation and evolution of massive stars and their circumstellar disks.

 
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Award ID(s):
2142300 2008101
NSF-PAR ID:
10498235
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Nature
Volume:
625
Issue:
7993
ISSN:
0028-0836
Page Range / eLocation ID:
55 to 59
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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