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Title: Rejuvenation of degraded Zener diodes with the electron wind force
Abstract

In this study, we explore the rejuvenation of a Zener diode degraded by high electrical stress, leading to a leftward shift, and broadening of the Zener breakdown voltage knee, alongside a 57% reduction in forward current. We employed a non-thermal annealing method involving high-density electric pulses with short pulse width and low frequency. The annealing process took <30 s at near-ambient temperature. Raman spectroscopy supports the electrical characterization, showing enhancement in crystallinity to explain the restoration of the breakdown knee followed by improvement in forward current by ∼85%.

 
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Award ID(s):
2103928
NSF-PAR ID:
10501046
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.35848
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Express
Volume:
17
Issue:
4
ISSN:
1882-0778
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: Article No. 047001
Size(s):
Article No. 047001
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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