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Title: Winds and Disk Turbulence Exert Equal Torques on Thick Magnetically Arrested Disks
Abstract

The conventional accretion disk lore is that magnetized turbulence is the principal angular momentum transport process that drives accretion. However, when dynamically important large-scale magnetic fields thread an accretion disk, they can produce mass and angular momentum outflows, known as winds,that also drive accretion. Yet, the relative importance of turbulent and wind-driven angular momentum transport is still poorly understood. To probe this question, we analyze a long-duration (1.2 × 105rg/c) simulation of a rapidly rotating (a= 0.9) black hole feeding from a thick (H/r∼ 0.3), adiabatic, magnetically arrested disk (MAD), whose dynamically important magnetic field regulates mass inflow and drives both uncollimated and collimated outflows (i.e., winds and jets, respectively). By carefully disentangling the various angular momentum transport processes within the system, we demonstrate the novel result that disk winds and disk turbulence both extract roughly equal amounts of angular momentum from the disk. We find cumulative angular momentum and mass accretion outflow rates ofL̇r0.9andṀr0.4, respectively. This result suggests that understanding both turbulent and laminar stresses is key to understanding the evolution of systems where geometrically thick MADs can occur, such as the hard state of X-ray binaries, low-luminosity active galactic nuclei, some tidal disruption events, and possibly gamma-ray bursts.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10501262
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
965
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0004-637X
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: Article No. 175
Size(s):
["Article No. 175"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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