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Title: Chiral-structured heterointerfaces enable durable perovskite solar cells

Mechanical failure and chemical degradation of device heterointerfaces can strongly influence the long-term stability of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) under thermal cycling and damp heat conditions. We report chirality-mediated interfaces based onR-/S-methylbenzyl-ammonium between the perovskite absorber and electron-transport layer to create an elastic yet strong heterointerface with increased mechanical reliability. This interface harnesses enantiomer-controlled entropy to enhance tolerance to thermal cycling–induced fatigue and material degradation, and a heterochiral arrangement of organic cations leads to closer packing of benzene rings, which enhances chemical stability and charge transfer. The encapsulated PSCs showed retentions of 92% of power-conversion efficiency under a thermal cycling test (−40°C to 85°C; 200 cycles over 1200 hours) and 92% under a damp heat test (85% relative humidity; 85°C; 600 hours).

 
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Award ID(s):
2305138
NSF-PAR ID:
10509037
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
384
Issue:
6698
ISSN:
0036-8075
Page Range / eLocation ID:
878 to 884
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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