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This content will become publicly available on October 18, 2024

Title: Expanding Pathways for Hispanic Students to Enter and Succeed in Computing Graduate Studies
Involving diverse individuals who bring different perspectives, experiences, and disciplinary knowledge in solving problems is critical to our nation's ability to innovate and compete in a global economy. Unfortunately, the trends in the number of graduates with advanced degrees, particularly ethnically and racially diverse citizens and permanent residents, are insufficient to meet current and future national needs. This is exacerbated in computing, which is one of the least diverse fields. Despite the growth in numbers of Hispanics nationally and their representation in undergraduate studies, the number of Hispanic citizens and permanent residents who enter and complete graduate computing studies is disturbingly low. Studies report that Hispanic graduate students across all fields of study feel isolated and alienated, face a lack of support, experience low expectations from faculty, and a negative racial/ethnic climate. Students often encounter a STEM culture centered on competition and selectivity, and this must be addressed to increase pathways to the doctorate to support our nation's economic and national security goals. This paper describes a collective effort of institutions with high enrollments of Hispanic students that have built partnerships among non-doctoral-granting and doctoral-granting institutions to increase the representation of Hispanics in graduate studies. Led by NSF's Eddie Bernice Johnson Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (CAHSI), the collective employs evidence-based practices grounded in the Hispanic-servingness literature to address the root causes.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2137791
NSF-PAR ID:
10509420
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
IEEE
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2023 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 9
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
["research experiences of undergraduates","Affinity Research Group Model","graduate studies","computing","Hispanic servingness"]
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
College Station, TX, USA
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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