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  1. The size and frequency of wildland fires in the western United States have dramatically increased in recent years. On high-fire-risk days, a small fire ignition can rapidly grow and become out of control. Early detection of fire ignitions from initial smoke can assist the response to such fires before they become difficult to manage. Past deep learning approaches for wildfire smoke detection have suffered from small or unreliable datasets that make it difficult to extrapolate performance to real-world scenarios. In this work, we present the Fire Ignition Library (FIgLib), a publicly available dataset of nearly 25,000 labeled wildfire smoke images as seen from fixed-view cameras deployed in Southern California. We also introduce SmokeyNet, a novel deep learning architecture using spatiotemporal information from camera imagery for real-time wildfire smoke detection. When trained on the FIgLib dataset, SmokeyNet outperforms comparable baselines and rivals human performance. We hope that the availability of the FIgLib dataset and the SmokeyNet architecture will inspire further research into deep learning methods for wildfire smoke detection, leading to automated notification systems that reduce the time to wildfire response. 
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  2. null (Ed.)
    The Neuroscience domain stands out from the field of sciences for its dependence on the study and characterization of complex, intertwining structures. Understanding the complexity of the brain has led to widespread advances in the structure of large-scale computing resources and the design of artificially intelligent analysis systems. However, the scale of problems and data generated continues to grow and outpace the standards and practices of neuroscience. In this paper, we present an automated neuroscience reconstruction framework, called NeuroKube, for large-scale processing and labeling of neuroimage volumes. Automated labels are generated through a machine-learning (ML) workflow, with data-intensive steps feeding through multiple GPU stages and distributed data locations leveraging autoscalable cloud-native deployments on a multi-institution Kubernetes system. Leading-edge hardwareand storage empower multiple stages of machine-learning, GPU accelerated solutions. This demonstrates an abstract approach to allocating the resources and algorithms needed to elucidate the highly complex structures of the brain. We summarize an integrated gateway architecture, and a scalable workflowdriven segmentation and reconstruction environment that brings together image big data with state-of-the-art, extensible machinelearning methods. 
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