skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Balazinska, Magdalena"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Recent work has reemphasized the importance of cardinality estimates for query optimization. While new techniques have continuously improved in accuracy over time, they still generally allow for under-estimates which often lead optimizers to make overly optimistic decisions. This can be very costly for expensive queries. An alternative approach to estimation is cardinality bounding, also called pessimistic cardinality estimation, where the cardinality estimator provides guaranteed upper bounds of the true cardinality. By never underestimating, this approach allows the optimizer to avoid potentially inefficient plans. However, existing pessimistic cardinality estimators are not yet practical: they use very limited statistics on the data, and cannot handle predicates. In this paper, we introduce SafeBound, the first practical system for generating cardinality bounds. SafeBound builds on a recent theoretical work that uses degree sequences on join attributes to compute cardinality bounds, extends this framework with predicates, introduces a practical compression method for the degree sequences, and implements an efficient inference algorithm. Across four workloads, SafeBound achieves up to 80% lower end-to-end runtimes than PostgreSQL, and is on par or better than state of the art ML-based estimators and pessimistic cardinality estimators, by improving the runtime of the expensive queries. It also saves up to 500x in query planning time, and uses up to 6.8x less space compared to state of the art cardinality estimation methods. 
    more » « less
  2. We design, implement, and evaluate DeepEverest, a system for the efficient execution of interpretation by example queries over the activation values of a deep neural network. DeepEverest consists of an efficient indexing technique and a query execution algorithm with various optimizations. We prove that the proposed query execution algorithm is instance optimal. Experiments with our prototype show that DeepEverest, using less than 20% of the storage of full materialization, significantly accelerates individual queries by up to 63X and consistently outperforms other methods on multi-query workloads that simulate DNN interpretation processes. 
    more » « less
  3. Current video database management systems (VDBMSs) fail to support the growing number of video datasets in diverse domains because these systems assume clean data and rely on pretrained models to detect known objects or actions. Existing systems also lack good support for compositional queries that seek events con- sisting of multiple objects with complex spatial and temporal rela- tionships. In this paper, we propose VOCAL, a vision of a VDBMS that supports efficient data cleaning, exploration and organization, and compositional queries, even when no pretrained model exists to extract semantic content. These techniques utilize optimizations to minimize the manual effort required of users. 
    more » « less
  4. null (Ed.)
    Modern video data management systems store videos as a single encoded file, which significantly limits possible storage level optimizations. We design, implement, and evaluate TASM, a new tile-based storage manager for video data. TASM uses a feature in modern video codecs called "tiles" that enables spatial random access into encoded videos. TASM physically tunes stored videos by optimizing their tile layouts given the video content and a query workload. Additionally, TASM dynamically tunes that layout in response to changes in the query workload or if the query workload and video contents are incrementally discovered. Finally, TASM also produces efficient initial tile layouts for newly ingested videos. We demonstrate that TASM can speed up subframe selection queries by an average of over 50% and up to 94%. TASM can also improve the throughput of the full scan phase of object detection queries by up to 2×. 
    more » « less
  5. Open world database management systems assume tuples not in the database still exist and are becoming an increas- ingly important area of research. We present Themis, the first open world database that automatically rebalances ar- bitrarily biased samples to approximately answer queries as if they were issued over the entire population. We lever- age apriori population aggregate information to develop and combine two different approaches for automatic debiasing: sample reweighting and Bayesian network probabilistic mod- eling. We build a prototype of Themis and demonstrate that Themis achieves higher query accuracy than the default AQP approach, an alternative sample reweighting technique, and a variety of Bayesian network models while maintaining in- teractive query response times. We also show that Themis is robust to differences in the support between the sample and population, a key use case when using social media samples. 
    more » « less
  6. Deep learning (DL) models have achieved paradigm-changing performance in many fields with high dimensional data, such as images, audio, and text. However, the black-box nature of deep neural networks is not only a barrier to adoption in applications such as medical diagnosis, where interpretability is essential, but it also impedes diagnosis of under performing models. The task of diagnosing or explaining DL models requires the computation of additional artifacts, such as activation values and gradients. These artifacts are large in volume, and their computation, storage, and querying raise significant data management challenges. In this paper, we develop a novel data sampling technique that produces approximate but accurate results for these model debugging queries. Our sampling technique utilizes the lower dimension representation learned by the DL model and focuses on model decision boundaries for the data in this lower dimensional space. 
    more » « less
  7. null (Ed.)
    Recently, video database management systems (VDBMSs) have re-emerged as an active area of research and development. To accelerate innovation in this area, we present Visual Road, a benchmark that evaluates the performance of these systems. Visual Road comes with a data generator and a suite of queries over cameras positioned within a simulated metropolitan environment. Visual Road's video data is automatically generated with a high degree of realism, and annotated using a modern simulation and visualization engine. This allows for VDBMS performance evaluation while scaling up the size of the input data. Visual Road is designed to evaluate a broad variety of VDBMSs: real-time systems, systems for longitudinal analytical queries, systems processing traditional videos, and systems designed for 360 videos. We use the benchmark to evaluate three recent VDBMSs both in capabilities and performance. 
    more » « less
  8. We present the data model, architecture, and evaluation ofLightDB, a database management system designed to efficientlymanage virtual, augmented, and mixed reality (VAMR) video con-tent. VAMR video differs from its two-dimensional counterpartin that it is spherical with periodic angular dimensions, is nonuni-formly and continuously sampled, and applications that consumesuch videos often have demanding latency and throughput require-ments. To address these challenges, LightDB treats VAMR videodata as a logically-continuous six-dimensional light field. Further-more, LightDB supports a rich set of operations over light fields,and automatically transforms declarative queries into executablephysical plans. We have implemented a prototype of LightDB and,through experiments with VAMR applications in the literature, wefind that LightDB offers up to 4×throughput improvements com-pared with prior work. 
    more » « less
  9. null (Ed.)
    Every few years a group of database researchers meets to discuss the state of database research, its impact on practice, and important new directions. This report summarizes the discussion and conclusions of the eighth such meeting, held October 14- 15, 2013 in Irvine, California. It observes that Big Data has now become a defining challenge of our time, and that the database research community is uniquely positioned to address it, with enormous opportunities to make transformative impact. To do so, the report recommends significantly more attention to five research areas: scalable big/fast data infrastructures; coping with diversity in the data management landscape; end-to-end processing and understanding of data; cloud services; and managing the diverse roles of people in the data life cycle. 
    more » « less