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  1. Abstract

    The coarse-grained propagation of galactic cosmic rays (CRs) is traditionally constrained by phenomenological models of Milky Way CR propagation fit to a variety of direct and indirect observables; however, constraining the fine-grained transport of CRs along individual magnetic field lines—for instance, diffusive vs streaming transport models—is an unsolved challenge. Leveraging a recent training set of magnetohydrodynamic turbulent box simulations, with CRs spanning a range of transport parameters, we use convolutional neural networks (CNNs) trained solely on gas density maps to classify CR transport regimes. We find that even relatively simple CNNs can quite effectively classify density slices to corresponding CR transport parameters, distinguishing between streaming and diffusive transport, as well as magnitude of diffusivity, with class accuracies between 92% and 99%. As we show, the transport-dependent imprints that CRs leave on the gas are not all tied to the resulting density power spectra: classification accuracies are still high even when image spectra are flattened (85%–98% accuracy), highlighting CR transport-dependent changes to turbulent phase information. We interpret our results with saliency maps and image modifications, and we discuss physical insights and future applications.

     
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  2. Abstract

    While it is well known that cosmic rays (CRs) can gain energy from turbulence via second-order Fermi acceleration, how this energy transfer affects the turbulent cascade remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that damping and steepening of the compressive turbulent power spectrum are expected once the damping timetdampρv2/ĖCRECR1becomes comparable to the turbulent cascade time. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of stirred compressive turbulence in a gas-CR fluid with diffusive CR transport show clear imprints of CR-induced damping, saturating atĖCRϵ˜, whereϵ˜is the turbulent energy input rate. In that case, almost all of the energy in large-scale motions is absorbed by CRs and does not cascade down to grid scale. Through a Hodge–Helmholtz decomposition, we confirm that purely compressive forcing can generate significant solenoidal motions, and we find preferential CR damping of the compressive component in simulations with diffusion and streaming, rendering small-scale turbulence largely solenoidal, with implications for thermal instability and proposed resonant scattering ofE≳ 300 GeV CRs by fast modes. When CR transport is streaming dominated, CRs also damp large-scale motions, with kinetic energy reduced by up to 1 order of magnitude in realisticECREgscenarios, but turbulence (with a reduced amplitude) still cascades down to small scales with the same power spectrum. Such large-scale damping implies that turbulent velocities obtained from the observed velocity dispersion may significantly underestimate turbulent forcing rates, i.e.,ϵ˜ρv3/L.

     
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  3. ABSTRACT

    We investigate how cosmic rays (CRs) affect thermal and hydrostatic stability of circumgalactic (CGM) gas, in simulations with both CR streaming and diffusion. Local thermal instability can be suppressed by CR-driven entropy mode propagation, in accordance with previous analytic work. However, there is only a narrow parameter regime where this operates, before CRs overheat the background gas. As mass dropout from thermal instability causes the background density and hence plasma β ≡ Pg/PB to fall, the CGM becomes globally unstable. At the cool disc-to-hot−halo interface, a sharp drop in density boosts Alfven speeds and CR gradients, driving a transition from diffusive to streaming transport. CR forces and heating strengthen, while countervailing gravitational forces and radiative cooling weaken, resulting in a loss of both hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. In lower β haloes, CR heating drives a hot, single-phase diffuse wind with velocities v ∝ (theat/tff)−1, which exceeds the escape velocity when theat/tff ≲ 0.4. In higher β haloes, where the Alfven Mach number is higher, CR forces drive multi-phase winds with cool, dense fountain flows and significant turbulence. These flows are CR dominated due to ‘trapping’ of CRs by weak transverse B-fields, and have the highest mass loading factors. Thus, local thermal instability can result in winds or fountain flows where either the heat or momentum input of CRs dominates.

     
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  4. Abstract

    Subsonic, compressive turbulence transfers energy to cosmic rays (CRs), a process known as nonresonant reacceleration. It is often invoked to explain the observed ratios of primary to secondary CRs at ∼GeV energies, assuming wholly diffusive CR transport. However, such estimates ignore the impact of CR self-confinement and streaming. We study these issues in stirring box magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using Athena++, with field-aligned diffusive and streaming CR transport. For diffusion only, we find CR reacceleration rates in good agreement with analytic predictions. When streaming is included, reacceleration rates depend on plasmaβ. Due to streaming-modified phase shifts between CR and gas variables, they are slower than canonical reacceleration rates in low-βenvironments like the interstellar medium but remain unchanged in high-βenvironments like the intracluster medium. We also quantify the streaming energy-loss rate in our simulations. For sub-Alfvénic turbulence, it is resolution dependent (hence unconverged in large-scale simulations) and heavily suppressed compared to the isotropic loss ratevA· ∇PCR/PCRvA/L0, due to misalignment between the mean field and isotropic CR gradients. Unlike acceleration efficiencies, CR losses are almost independent of magnetic field strength overβ∼ 1–100 and are, therefore, not the primary factor behind lower acceleration rates when streaming is included. While this paper is primarily concerned with how turbulence affects CRs, in a follow-up paper we consider how CRs affect turbulence by diverting energy from the MHD cascade, altering the pathway to gas heating and steepening the turbulent spectrum.

     
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  5. Abstract

    The Magellanic Stream is sculpted by its infall through the Milky Way’s circumgalactic medium, but the rates and directions of mass, momentum, and energy exchange through the stream-halo interface are relative unknowns critical for determining the origin and fate of the Stream. Complementary to large-scale simulations of LMC-SMC interactions, we apply new insights derived from idealized, high-resolutioncloud-crushingand radiative turbulent mixing layer simulations to the Leading Arm and Trailing Stream. Contrary to classical expectations of fast cloud breakup, we predict that the Leading Arm and much of the Trailing Stream should be surviving infall and even gaining mass due to strong radiative cooling. Provided a sufficiently supersonic tidal swing-out from the Clouds, the present-day Leading Arm could be a series of high-density clumps in the cooling tail behind the progenitor cloud. We back up our analytic framework with a suite of converged wind-tunnel simulations, finding that previous results on cloud survival and mass growth can be extended to high Mach number () flows with a modified drag timetdrag1+and longer growth time. We also simulate the Trailing Stream; we find that the growth time is long (approximately gigayears) compared to the infall time, and approximate Hαemission is low on average (∼ a few milliRayleigh) but can be up to tens of milliRayleigh in bright spots. Our findings also have broader extragalactic implications, e.g., galactic winds, which we discuss.

     
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