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  1. Abstract

    We present a novel methodology to generate mechanical structures based on the idea of fractal geometry as described by the chaos game. Chaos game is an iterative method that generates self-similar point-sets in the limiting case within a polygonal domain. By computing Voronoi tessellations on these point-sets, our method generates mechanical structures that adopts the self-similarity of the point-sets resulting in fractal distribution of local stiffness. The motivation behind our approach comes from the observation that a typical generative structural design workflow requires the ability to generate families of structures that possess shared behavioral (e.g. thermal, mechanical, etc.) characteristics making each structure distinct but feasible. However, the generation of the alternatives, almost always, requires solving an inverse structural problem which is both conceptually and computationally challenging. The objective of our work is to develop and investigate a forward-design methodology for generating families of structures that, while not identical, exhibit similar mechanical behavior in a statistical sense. To this end, the central hypothesis of our work is that structures generated using the chaos game can generate families of self-similar structures that, while not identical, exhibit similar mechanical behavior in a statistical sense. Furthermore, each family is uniquely identifiable from the parameters of the chaos game, namely, the polygonal domain, fractional distance, and number of samples. We present a systematic study of these self-similar structures through modal analysis and demonstrate a preliminary confirmation of our hypothesis.

     
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available August 20, 2024
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available August 1, 2024
  3. In this work, we introduce an approach to model topologically interlocked corrugated bricks that can be assembled in a water-tight manner (space-filling) to design a variety of spatial structures. Our approach takes inspiration from recently developed methods that utilize Voronoi tessellation of spatial domains by using symmetrically arranged Voronoi sites. However, in contrast to these existing methods, we focus our attention on Voronoi sites modeled using helical trajectories, which can provide corrugation and better interlocking. For symmetries, we only use affine transformations based on the Bravais lattice to avoid self-intersections. This methodology naturally results in structures that are both space-filling (owing to Voronoi tessellation) as well as interlocking by corrugation (owing to helical trajectories). The resulting shapes of the bricks appear to be similar to a variety of pasta noodles, thereby inspiring the names, Voronoi Spaghetti and VoroNoodles. 
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  4. Abstract In this paper, we introduce a novel prototyping workflow, QuickProbe, that enables a user to create quick-and-dirty prototypes taking direct inspiration from existing physical objects. Our workflow is inspired by the notion of prototyping-in-context using physical scaffolds in digital environments. To achieve this we introduce a simple kinesthetic-geometric curve representation wherein we integrated the geometric representation of the curve with the virtual kinesthetic feedback. We test the efficacy of this kinesthetic-geometric curve representation through a qualitative user study conducted with ten participants. In this study, users were asked to generate wire-frame curve networks on top of the physical shapes by sampling multiple control points along the surface. We conducted two different sets of experiments in this work. In the first set of experiments, users were tasked with tracing the physical shape of the object. In the second set of experiments, the goal was to explore different artistic designs that the user could draw using the physical scaffolding of the shapes. Through our user studies, we showed the variety of designs that the users were able to create. We also evaluated the similarities and differences we observed between the two different sets of experiments. We further discuss the user feedback and the possible design scenarios where our QuickProbe workflow can be used. 
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  5. A novel methodology is introduced for designing auxetic (negative Poisson's ratio) structures based on topological principles and is demonstrated by investigating a new class of auxetics based on two‐dimensional (2D) textile weave patterns. Conventional methodology for designing auxetic materials typically involves determining a single deformable block (a unit cell) of material whose shape results in auxetic behavior. Consequently, patterning such a unit cell in a 2D (or 3D) domain results in a larger structure that exhibits overall auxetic behavior. Such an approach naturally relies on some prior intuition and experience regarding which unit cells may be auxetic. Second, tuning the properties of the resulting structures is typically limited to parametric variations of the geometry of a specific type of unit cell. Thus, most of the currently known auxetic structures belong to a selected few classes of unit cell geometries that are explicitly defined in accordance with a specified topological (i.e., grid structure). Herein, a new class of auxetic structures is demonstrated that, while periodic, can be generated implicitly, i.e., without reference to a specific unit cell design. The approach leverages weave‐based parameters (ABC), resulting in a rich design space for auxetics that is previously unexplored.

     
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  6. An approach for modeling topologically interlocked building blocks that can be assembled in a water‐tight manner (space filling) to design a variety of spatial structures is introduced. This approach takes inspiration from recent methods utilizing Voronoi tessellation of spatial domains using symmetrically arranged Voronoi sites. Attention is focused on building blocks that result from helical stacking of planar 2‐honeycombs (i.e., tessellations of the plane with a single prototile) generated through a combination of wallpaper symmetries and Voronoi tessellation. This unique combination gives rise to structures that are both space‐filling (due to Voronoi tessellation) and interlocking (due to helical trajectories). Algorithms are developed to generate two different varieties of helical building blocks, namely, corrugated and smooth. These varieties result naturally from the method of discretization and shape generation and lead to distinct interlocking behavior. In order to study these varieties, finite‐element analyses (FEA) are conducted on different tiles parametrized by 1) the polygonal unit cell determined by the wallpaper symmetry and 2) the parameters of the helical line generating the Voronoi tessellation. Analyses reveal that the new design of the geometry of the building blocks enables strong variation of the engagement force between the blocks.

     
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  7. We present a continuous, narrow-linewidth, tunable laser system that outputs up to 14.0 W at 770 nm. The light is generated by frequency doubling 18.8 W of light from a 1540 nm fiber amplifier that is seeded by a single-mode diode laser achieving><#comment/>74%<#comment/>conversion efficiency. We utilize a lithium triborate crystal in an enhancement ring cavity. The low intensity noise and narrow linewidth of the 770 nm output are suitable for cold atom experiments.

     
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  8. Ensemble qubits with strong coupling to photons and resilience against single atom loss are promising candidates for building quantum networks. We report on progress towards high fidelity preparation and control of ensemble qubits using Rydberg blockade. Our previous demonstration of ensemble qubit preparation at a fidelity <60% was possibly limited by Rydberg blockade leakage due to uncontrolled short range atom pair separation. We show progress towards ensembles with a blue-detuned 1-D lattice on top of the existing red-detuned dipole trap, which will suppress unwanted Rydberg interactions by imposing constraints on the atomic separation. We study the effect of lattice insertion on the fidelity of ensemble state preparation and Rydberg-mediated gates. Studies of cooperative scattering from a 1D atomic array will also be presented. 
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  9. We present progress in demonstrating Rydberg interactions between a single Rb and a single Cs atom simultaneously trapped in a single 1064 nm optical tweezer. Rydberg levels in heteronuclear systems have different quantum defects, as opposed to homonuclear systems, and can therefore be chosen to minimize the Forster defect and increase the Rydberg interaction strength beyond symmetric Rydberg pairs at comparable energy levels. Additionally, multispecies systems are distinguishable and can be frequency multiplexed in a straightforward manner, enabling crosstalk free ancilla measurements for quantum error correction. To determine the feasibility of co-trapped heteronuclear samples for quantum information and communication applications, we also measure the heteronuclear collision rates between single Rb and single Cs atoms and resolve differences in the hyperfine collision rates. Photoassociation rate of the atoms into a molecular state via the 1064 nm trap laser is also measured. 
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