skip to main content

Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Ghosh, S K"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. ABSTRACT

    The star-forming activity in the H ii region RCW 42 is investigated using multiple wavebands, from near-infrared to radio wavelengths. Located at a distance of 5.8 kpc, this southern region has a bolometric luminosity of 1.8 × 106 L⊙. The ionized gas emission has been imaged at low radio frequencies of 610 and 1280 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, India, and shows a large expanse of the H ii region, spanning 20 × 15 pc2. The average electron number density in the region is estimated to be ∼70 cm−3, which suggests an average ionization fraction of the cloud to be 11 % . An extended green object EGO G274.0649-01.1460 and several young stellar objects have been identified in the region using data from the 2MASS and Spitzer surveys. The dust emission from the associated molecular cloud is probed using Herschel Space Telescope, which reveals the presence of five clumps, C1-C5, in this region. Two millimetre emission cores of masses 380 and 390 M⊙ towards the radio emission peak have been identified towards C1 from the ALMA map at 1.4 mm. The clumps are investigated for their evolutionary stages based on association with various star-formation tracers, and we find that all the clumps are in active/evolved stage.

  2. ABSTRACT Star-forming galaxies are rich reservoirs of dust, both warm and cold. But the cold dust emission is faint alongside the relatively bright and ubiquitous warm dust emission. Recently, evidence for a very cold dust (VCD) component has also been revealed via millimetre/submillimetre (mm/sub-mm) photometry of some galaxies. This component, despite being the most massive of the three dust components in star-forming galaxies, is by virtue of its very low temperature, faint and hard to detect together with the relatively bright emission from warmer dust. Here, we analyse the dust content of a carefully selected sample of four galaxies detected by IRAS, WISE, and South Pole Telescope (SPT), whose spectral energy distributions (SEDs) were modelled to constrain their potential cold dust content. Low-frequency radio observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) were carried out to segregate cold dust emission from non-thermal emission in mm/sub-mm wavebands. We also carried out AstroSat/Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) observations for some galaxies to constrain their SED at shorter wavelengths so as to enforce energy balance for the SED modelling. We constructed their SEDs across a vast wavelength range (extending from UV to radio frequencies) by assembling global photometry from GALEX FUV + NUV, UVIT,more »Johnson BRI, 2MASS, WISE, IRAC, IRAS, AKARI, ISO PHOT, Planck HFI, SPT, and GMRT. The SEDs were modelled with cigale to estimate their basic properties, in particular to constrain the masses of their total and VCD components. Although the galaxies’ dust masses are dominated by warmer dust, there are hints of VCD in two of the targets, NGC 7496 and NGC 7590.« less
  3. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 7, 2023
  4. Abstract In particle collider experiments, elementary particle interactions with large momentum transfer produce quarks and gluons (known as partons) whose evolution is governed by the strong force, as described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) 1 . These partons subsequently emit further partons in a process that can be described as a parton shower 2 , which culminates in the formation of detectable hadrons. Studying the pattern of the parton shower is one of the key experimental tools for testing QCD. This pattern is expected to depend on the mass of the initiating parton, through a phenomenon known as the dead-cone effect, which predicts a suppression of the gluon spectrum emitted by a heavy quark of mass m Q and energy E , within a cone of angular size m Q / E around the emitter 3 . Previously, a direct observation of the dead-cone effect in QCD had not been possible, owing to the challenge of reconstructing the cascading quarks and gluons from the experimentally accessible hadrons. We report the direct observation of the QCD dead cone by using new iterative declustering techniques 4,5 to reconstruct the parton shower of charm quarks. This result confirms a fundamental featuremore »of QCD. Furthermore, the measurement of a dead-cone angle constitutes a direct experimental observation of the non-zero mass of the charm quark, which is a fundamental constant in the standard model of particle physics.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 19, 2023
  5. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  6. Abstract The multiplicity dependence of jet production in pp collisions at the centre-of-mass energy of $$\sqrt{s} = 13\ {\mathrm {TeV}}$$ s = 13 TeV is studied for the first time. Jets are reconstructed from charged particles using the anti- $$k_\mathrm {T}$$ k T algorithm with resolution parameters R varying from 0.2 to 0.7. The jets are measured in the pseudorapidity range $$|\eta _{\mathrm{jet}}|< 0.9-R$$ | η jet | < 0.9 - R and in the transverse momentum range $$5more »shows only a weak dependence on jet transverse momentum and resolution parameter at the highest multiplicity. While such behaviour is qualitatively described by the present version of PYTHIA, quantitative description may require implementing new mechanisms for multi-particle production in hadronic collisions.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  7. A bstract A measurement of inclusive, prompt, and non-prompt J/ ψ production in p-Pb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy $$ \sqrt{s_{\mathrm{NN}}} $$ s NN = 5 . 02 TeV is presented. The inclusive J/ ψ mesons are reconstructed in the dielectron decay channel at midrapidity down to a transverse momentum p T = 0. The inclusive J/ ψ nuclear modification factor R pPb is calculated by comparing the new results in p-Pb collisions to a recently measured proton-proton reference at the same centre-of-mass energy. Non-prompt J/ ψ mesons, which originate from the decay of beauty hadrons, are separated from promptly produced J/ ψ on a statistical basis for p T larger than 1.0 GeV/ c . These results are based on the data sample collected by the ALICE detector during the 2016 LHC p-Pb run, corresponding to an integrated luminosity $$ \mathcal{L} $$ L int = 292 ± 11 μ b − 1 , which is six times larger than the previous publications. The total uncertainty on the p T -integrated inclusive J/ ψ and non-prompt J/ ψ cross section are reduced by a factor 1.7 and 2.2, respectively. The measured cross sections and R pPb are compared withmore »theoretical models that include various combinations of cold nuclear matter effects. From the non-prompt J/ ψ production cross section, the $$ \mathrm{b}\overline{\mathrm{b}} $$ b b ¯ production cross section at midrapidity, $$ {\mathrm{d}\sigma}_{\mathrm{b}\overline{\mathrm{b}}} $$ d σ b b ¯ / d y , and the total cross section extrapolated over full phase space, $$ {\sigma}_{\mathrm{b}\overline{\mathrm{b}}} $$ σ b b ¯ , are derived.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  8. Abstract The study of the production of nuclei and antinuclei in pp collisions has proven to be a powerful tool to investigate the formation mechanism of loosely bound states in high-energy hadronic collisions. In this paper, the production of protons, deuterons and $$^{3}\mathrm {He}$$ 3 He and their charge conjugates at midrapidity is studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in inelastic pp collisions at $$\sqrt{s}=5.02$$ s = 5.02 TeV using the ALICE detector. Within the uncertainties, the yields of nuclei in pp collisions at $$\sqrt{s}=5.02$$ s = 5.02 TeV are compatible with those in pp collisions at different energies and to those in p–Pb collisions when compared at similar multiplicities. The measurements are compared with the expectations of coalescence and Statistical Hadronisation Models. The results suggest a common formation mechanism behind the production of light nuclei in hadronic interactions and confirm that they do not depend on the collision energy but on the number of produced particles.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023
  9. Abstract Angular correlations of heavy-flavour and charged particles in high-energy proton–proton collisions are sensitive to the production mechanisms of heavy quarks and to their fragmentation as well as hadronisation processes. The measurement of the azimuthal-correlation function of prompt D mesons with charged particles in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $$\sqrt{s} = 13$$ s = 13  TeV with the ALICE detector is reported, considering $$\mathrm D^{0} $$ D 0 , $$\mathrm D^{+} $$ D + , and $$\mathrm D^{*+} $$ D ∗ + mesons in the transverse-momentum interval $$3< p_{\mathrm{T}} < 36$$ 3 < p T < 36  GeV/ $$c$$ c at midrapidity ( $$|y| < 0.5$$ | y | < 0.5 ), and charged particles with $$p_{\mathrm{T}} > 0.3$$ p T > 0.3  GeV/ $$c$$ c and pseudorapidity $$|\eta | < 0.8$$ | η | < 0.8 . This measurement has an improved precision and provides an extended transverse-momentum coverage compared to previous ALICE measurements at lower energies. The study is also performed as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity, showing no modifications of the correlation function with multiplicity within uncertainties. The properties and the transverse-momentum evolution of the near- and away-side correlation peaks are studied and comparedmore »with predictions from various Monte Carlo event generators. Among those considered, PYTHIA8 and POWHEG+PYTHIA8 provide the best description of the measured observables. The obtained results can provide guidance on tuning the generators.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023
  10. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023