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  1. Abstract

    The expansion of telecommunications incurs increasingly severe crosstalk and interference, and a physical layer cognitive method, called blind source separation (BSS), can effectively address these issues. BSS requires minimal prior knowledge to recover signals from their mixtures, agnostic to the carrier frequency, signal format, and channel conditions. However, previous electronic implementations did not fulfil this versatility due to the inherently narrow bandwidth of radio-frequency (RF) components, the high energy consumption of digital signal processors (DSP), and their shared weaknesses of low scalability. Here, we report a photonic BSS approach that inherits the advantages of optical devices and fully fulfils its “blindness” aspect. Using a microring weight bank integrated on a photonic chip, we demonstrate energy-efficient, wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) scalable BSS across 19.2 GHz processing bandwidth. Our system also has a high (9-bit) resolution for signal demixing thanks to a recently developed dithering control method, resulting in higher signal-to-interference ratios (SIR) even for ill-conditioned mixtures.

     
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  2. Blind source separation (BSS) becomes popularly useful with the need for increased bandwidth utilization. However, the traditional radio-frequency (RF) electronics hardly offer the BSS the demanded frequency agility because of the inherent bandwidth limitation. The emerging integrated photonics, fortunately, can be an efficacious alternative. Here, we demonstrate a photonic BSS approach based on the microring (MRR) weightbank that achieves blind source separation of up to 13.8 GHz bandwidth. In addition, by implementing an improved MRR control method with an accuracy of up to 8.5 bits, the reduced errors give confidence in solving BSS problems with a large ill-condition number. 
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  3. Deep neural networks (DNNs) consist of layers of neurons interconnected by synaptic weights. A high bit-precision in weights is generally required to guarantee high accuracy in many applications. Minimizing error accumulation between layers is also essential when building large-scale networks. Recent demonstrations of photonic neural networks are limited in bit-precision due to cross talk and the high sensitivity of optical components (e.g., resonators). Here, we experimentally demonstrate a record-high precision of 9 bits with a dithering control scheme for photonic synapses. We then numerically simulated the impact with increased synaptic precision on a wireless signal classification application. This work could help realize the potential of photonic neural networks for many practical, real-world tasks.

     
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  4. Kitayama, Ken-ichi ; Jalali, Bahram (Ed.)
  5. Abstract Neuromorphic photonic processors based on resonator weight banks are an emerging candidate technology for enabling modern artificial intelligence (AI) in high speed analog systems. These purpose-built analog devices implement vector multiplications with the physics of resonator devices, offering efficiency, latency, and throughput advantages over equivalent electronic circuits. Along with these advantages, however, often come the difficult challenges of compensation for fabrication variations and environmental disturbances. In this paper, we review sources of variation and disturbances from our experiments, as well as mathematically define quantities that model them. Then, we introduce how the physics of resonators can be exploited to weight and sum multiwavelength signals. Finally, we outline automated design and control methodologies necessary to create practical, manufacturable, and high accuracy/precision resonator weight banks that can withstand operating conditions in the field. This represents a road map for unlocking the potential of resonator weight banks in practical deployment scenarios. 
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  6. null (Ed.)
    Artificial intelligence and neuromorphic computing driven by neural networks has enabled many applications. Software implementations of neural networks on electronic platforms are limited in speed and energy efficiency. Neuromorphic photonics aims to build processors in which optical hardware mimic neural networks in the brain. 
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  7. Dong, P. ; Kani, J. ; Xie, C. ; Casellas, R. ; Cole, C. ; Li, M. (Ed.)
    Neuromorphic photonics creates processors 1000 × faster than electronics while consuming less energy. We will discuss the role of neuromorphic photonics in optical communications, review existing approaches, and outline the required technologies to evolve this field. 
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  8. Dong, P. ; Kani, J. ; Xie, C. ; Casellas, R. ; Cole, C. ; Li, M. (Ed.)
    Neuromorphic photonics exploit optical device physics for neuron models, and optical interconnects for distributed, parallel, and analog processing for high-bandwidth, low-latency and low switching energy applications in artificial intelligence and neuromorphic computing. 
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  9. null (Ed.)
    Artificial intelligence and neuromorphic computing driven by neural networks has enabled many applications. Software implementations of neural networks on electronic platforms are limited in speed and energy efficiency. Neuromorphic photonics aims to build processors in which optical hardware mimic neural networks in the brain. 
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