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  1. GPUs have become ubiquitous in the cloud due to the dramatic performance gains they enable in domains such as machine learning and computer vision. However, offloading GPU computation to the cloud requires placing enormous trust in providers and administrators. Recent proposals for GPU trusted execution environments (TEEs) are promising but fail to address very real side-channel concerns. To illustrate the severity of the problem, we demonstrate a novel attack that enables an attacker to correctly classify images from ImageNet by observing only the timing of GPU kernel execution, rather than the images themselves. Telekine enables applications to use GPU accelerationmore »in the cloud securely, based on a novel GPU stream abstraction that ensures execution and interaction through untrusted components are independent of any secret data. Given a GPU with support for a TEE, Telekine employs a novel variant of API remoting to partition application-level software into components to ensure secret-dependent behaviors occur only on trusted components. Telekine can securely train modern image recognition models on MXNet with 10%–22% performance penalty relative to an insecure baseline with a locally attached GPU. It runs graph algorithms using Galois on one and two GPUs with 18%–41% overhead.« less
  2. Current hardware and application storage trends put immense pressure on the operating system's storage subsystem. On the hardware side, the market for storage devices has diversified to a multi-layer storage topology spanning multiple orders of magnitude in cost and performance. Above the file system, applications increasingly need to process small, random IO on vast data sets with low latency, high throughput, and simple crash consistency. File systems designed for a single storage layer cannot support all of these demands together. We present Strata, a cross-media file system that leverages the strengths of one storage media to compensate for weaknesses ofmore »another. In doing so, Strata provides performance, capacity, and a simple, synchronous IO model all at once, while having a simpler design than that of file systems constrained by a single storage device. At its heart, Strata uses a log-structured approach with a novel split of responsibilities among user mode, kernel, and storage layers that separates the concerns of scalable, high-performance persistence from storage layer management. We quantify the performance benefits of Strata using a 3-layer storage hierarchy of emulated NVM, a flash-based SSD, and a high-density HDD. Strata has 20-30% better latency and throughput, across several unmodified applications, compared to file systems purpose-built for each layer, while providing synchronous and unified access to the entire storage hierarchy. Finally, Strata achieves up to 2.8x better throughput than a block-based 2-layer cache provided by Linux's logical volume manager.« less