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  1. Proc. 2023 ACM SIGKDD Int. Conf. on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (Ed.)
    Representation learning on networks aims to derive a meaningful vector representation for each node, thereby facilitating downstream tasks such as link prediction, node classification, and node clustering. In heterogeneous text-rich networks, this task is more challenging due to (1) presence or absence of text: Some nodes are associated with rich textual information, while others are not; (2) diversity of types: Nodes and edges of multiple types form a heterogeneous network structure. As pretrained language models (PLMs) have demonstrated their effectiveness in obtaining widely generalizable text representations, a substantial amount of effort has been made to incorporate PLMs into representation learning on text-rich networks. However, few of them can jointly consider heterogeneous structure (network) information as well as rich textual semantic information of each node effectively. In this paper, we propose Heterformer, a Heterogeneous Network-Empowered Transformer that performs contextualized text encoding and heterogeneous structure encoding in a unified model. Specifically, we inject heterogeneous structure information into each Transformer layer when encoding node texts. Meanwhile, Heterformer is capable of characterizing node/edge type heterogeneity and encoding nodes with or without texts. We conduct comprehensive experiments on three tasks (i.e., link prediction, node classification, and node clustering) on three large-scale datasets from different domains, where Heterformer outperforms competitive baselines significantly and consistently. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available August 4, 2024
  2. Proc. 2023 ACM SIGKDD Int. Conf. on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (Ed.)
    Instead of relying on human-annotated training samples to build a classifier, weakly supervised scientific paper classification aims to classify papers only using category descriptions (e.g., category names, category-indicative keywords). Existing studies on weakly supervised paper classification are less concerned with two challenges: (1) Papers should be classified into not only coarse-grained research topics but also fine-grained themes, and potentially into multiple themes, given a large and fine-grained label space; and (2) full text should be utilized to complement the paper title and abstract for classification. Moreover, instead of viewing the entire paper as a long linear sequence, one should exploit the structural information such as citation links across papers and the hierarchy of sections and paragraphs in each paper. To tackle these challenges, in this study, we propose FuTex, a framework that uses the cross-paper network structure and the in-paper hierarchy structure to classify full-text scientific papers under weak supervision. A network-aware contrastive fine-tuning module and a hierarchyaware aggregation module are designed to leverage the two types of structural signals, respectively. Experiments on two benchmark datasets demonstrate that FuTex significantly outperforms competitive baselines and is on par with fully supervised classifiers that use 1,000 to 60,000 ground-truth training samples. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available August 4, 2024
  3. A real-world text corpus sometimes comprises not only text documents, but also semantic links between them (e.g., academic papers in a bibliographic network are linked by citations and co-authorships). Text documents and semantic connections form a text-rich network, which empowers a wide range of downstream tasks such as classification and retrieval. However, pretraining methods for such structures are still lacking, making it difficult to build one generic model that can be adapted to various tasks on text-rich networks. Current pretraining objectives, such as masked language modeling, purely model texts and do not take inter-document structure information into consideration. To this end, we propose our PretrAining on TexT-Rich NetwOrk framework PATTON. PATTON1 includes two pretraining strategies: network-contextualized masked language modeling and masked node prediction, to capture the inherent dependency between textual attributes and network structure. We conduct experiments on four downstream tasks in five datasets from both academic and e-commerce domains, where PATTON outperforms baselines significantly and consistently. 
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  4. Edges in many real-world social/information networks are associated with rich text information (e.g., user-user communications or user-product reviews). However, mainstream network representation learning models focus on propagating and aggregating node attributes, lacking specific designs to utilize text semantics on edges. While there exist edge-aware graph neural networks, they directly initialize edge attributes as a feature vector, which cannot fully capture the contextualized text semantics of edges. In this paper, we propose Edgeformers, a framework built upon graph-enhanced Transformers, to perform edge and node representation learning by modeling texts on edges in a contextualized way. Specifically, in edge representation learning, we inject network information into each Transformer layer when encoding edge texts; in node representation learning, we aggregate edge representations through an attention mechanism within each node’s ego-graph. On five public datasets from three different domains, Edgeformers consistently outperform state-of-the-art baselines in edge classification and link prediction, demonstrating the efficacy in learning edge and node representations, respectively. 
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  5. Due to the exponential growth of scientific publications on the Web, there is a pressing need to tag each paper with fine-grained topics so that researchers can track their interested fields of study rather than drowning in the whole literature. Scientific literature tagging is beyond a pure multi-label text classification task because papers on the Web are prevalently accompanied by metadata information such as venues, authors, and references, which may serve as additional signals to infer relevant tags. Although there have been studies making use of metadata in academic paper classification, their focus is often restricted to one or two scientific fields (e.g., computer science and biomedicine) and to one specific model. In this work, we systematically study the effect of metadata on scientific literature tagging across 19 fields. We select three representative multi-label classifiers (i.e., a bag-of-words model, a sequence-based model, and a pre-trained language model) and explore their performance change in scientific literature tagging when metadata are fed to the classifiers as additional features. We observe some ubiquitous patterns of metadata’s effects across all fields (e.g., venues are consistently beneficial to paper tagging in almost all cases), as well as some unique patterns in fields other than computer science and biomedicine, which are not explored in previous studies. 
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