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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 1, 2024
  2. In ferromagnetic metals, transverse spin currents are thought to be absorbed via dephasing—i.e., destructive interference of spins precessing about the strong exchange field. Yet, due to the ultrashort coherence length of ≈1 nm in typical ferromagnetic thin films, it is difficult to distinguish dephasing in the bulk from spin-flip scattering at the interface. Here, to assess which mechanism dominates, we examine transverse spin-current absorption in ferromagnetic NiCu alloy films with reduced exchange fields. We observe that the coherence length increases with decreasing Curie temperature, as weaker dephasing in the film bulk slows down spin absorption. Moreover, nonmagnetic Cu impurities do not diminish the efficiency of spin-transfer torque from the absorbed spin current. Our findings affirm that the transverse spin current is predominantly absorbed by dephasing inside the nanometer-thick ferromagnetic metals, even with high impurity contents.

    Free, publicly-accessible full text available November 29, 2023
  3. The [Co(SQ) 2 (4-CN-py) 2 ] complex exhibits dynamical effects over a wide range of temperature. The orbital moment, determined by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) with decreasing applied magnetic field, indicates a nonzero critical field for net alignment of magnetic moments, an effect not seen with the spin moment of [Co(SQ) 2 (4-CN-py) 2 ].
  4. Abstract

    The emergence of ferromagnetism in materials where the bulk phase does not show any magnetic order demonstrates that atomically precise films can stabilize distinct ground states and expands the phase space for the discovery of materials. Here, the emergence of long-range magnetic order is reported in ultrathin (111) LaNiO3(LNO) films, where bulk LNO is paramagnetic, and the origins of this phase are explained. Transport and structural studies of LNO(111) films indicate that NiO6octahedral distortions stabilize a magnetic insulating phase at the film/substrate interface and result in a thickness-dependent metal–insulator transition att = 8 unit cells. Away from this interface, distortions relax and bulk-like conduction is regained. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and dynamical x-ray diffraction simulations confirm a corresponding out-of-plane unit-cell expansion at the interface of all films. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that distortion stabilizes an increased concentration of Ni2+ions. Evidence of long-range magnetic order is found in anomalous Hall effect and magnetoresistance measurements, likely due to ferromagnetic superexchange interactions among Ni2+–Ni3+ions. Together, these results indicate that long-range magnetic ordering and metallicity in LNO(111) films emerges from a balance among the spin, charge, lattice, and orbital degrees of freedom.

  5. null (Ed.)
  6. Neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy are employed to investigate the magnetism and spin structure in single-phase B20 Co1.043Si0.957. The magnetic contributions to the NPD data measured in zero fields are consistent with the helical order among the allowed spin structures derived from group theory. The magnitude of the magnetic moment is (0.3 ± 0.1) μB/Co according to NPD, while the surface magnetization probed by XMCD at 3 kOe is (0.18–0.31) μB/Co. Both values are substantially larger than the bulk magnetization of 0.11 μB/Co determined from magnetometry at 70 kOe and 2 K. These experimental data indicate the formation of a helical spin phase and the associated conical states in high magnetic fields.

    Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 11, 2023