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  1. The polarized photoluminescence from atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides is a frequently applied tool to scrutinize optical selection rules and valley physics, yet it is known to sensibly depend on a variety of internal and external material and sample properties. In this work, we apply combined angle- and polarization-resolved spectroscopy to explore the interplay of excitonic physics and phenomena arising from the commonly utilized encapsulation procedure on the optical properties of atomically thinMoSe2. We probe monolayers prepared in both suspended and encapsulated manners. We show that the hBN encapsulation significantly enhances the linear polarization of exciton photoluminescence emission at large emission angles. This degree of linear polarization of excitons can increase up to∼<#comment/>17%<#comment/>in the hBN encapsulated samples. As we confirm by finite-difference time-domain simulations, it can be directly connected to the optical anisotropy of the hBN layers. In comparison, the linear polarization at finite exciton momenta is significantly reduced in a suspendedMoSe2monolayer, and becomes notable only in cryogenic conditions. This phenomenon strongly suggests that the effect is rooted in the k-dependent anisotropic exchange coupling inherent in 2D excitons. Our results have strongmore »implications on further studies on valley contrasting selection rules and valley coherence phenomena using standard suspended and encapsulated samples.

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  2. Abstract The emergence of spatial and temporal coherence of light emitted from solid-state systems is a fundamental phenomenon intrinsically aligned with the control of light-matter coupling. It is canonical for laser oscillation, emerges in the superradiance of collective emitters, and has been investigated in bosonic condensates of thermalized light, as well as exciton-polaritons. Our room temperature experiments show the strong light-matter coupling between microcavity photons and excitons in atomically thin WSe 2 . We evidence the density-dependent expansion of spatial and temporal coherence of the emitted light from the spatially confined system ground-state, which is accompanied by a threshold-like response of the emitted light intensity. Additionally, valley-physics is manifested in the presence of an external magnetic field, which allows us to manipulate K and K’ polaritons via the valley-Zeeman-effect. Our findings validate the potential of atomically thin crystals as versatile components of coherent light-sources, and in valleytronic applications at room temperature.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2022