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Title: Spatial coherence of room-temperature monolayer WSe2 exciton-polaritons in a trap
Abstract The emergence of spatial and temporal coherence of light emitted from solid-state systems is a fundamental phenomenon intrinsically aligned with the control of light-matter coupling. It is canonical for laser oscillation, emerges in the superradiance of collective emitters, and has been investigated in bosonic condensates of thermalized light, as well as exciton-polaritons. Our room temperature experiments show the strong light-matter coupling between microcavity photons and excitons in atomically thin WSe 2 . We evidence the density-dependent expansion of spatial and temporal coherence of the emitted light from the spatially confined system ground-state, which is accompanied by a threshold-like response of the emitted light intensity. Additionally, valley-physics is manifested in the presence of an external magnetic field, which allows us to manipulate K and K’ polaritons via the valley-Zeeman-effect. Our findings validate the potential of atomically thin crystals as versatile components of coherent light-sources, and in valleytronic applications at room temperature.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2052527 2111812
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10315930
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
12
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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