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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 9, 2024
  2. Much of our knowledge of the North American lithosphere comes from imaging seismic velocities. Additional constraints on the subsurface can be gained by studying seismic attenuation, which has different sensitivity to physical properties. We produce a model of lateral variations in attenuation across the conterminous U.S. by analyzing data recorded by the EarthScope Transportable Array. We divide the study area into 12 overlapping tiles and differential attenuation is measured in each tile independently; and twice for four of the tiles. Measurements are combined into a smooth map using a set of linear inversions. Comparing results for adjacent tiles and for repeated tiles shows that the imaged features are robust. The final map shows generally higher attenuation west of the Rocky Mountain Front than east of it, with significant small length scale variations superimposed on that broad pattern. In general, there is a strong anticorrelation between differential attenuation and shear wave velocities at depths of 80–250 km. However, a given change in velocity may correspond to a large or small change in attenuation, depending on the area; suggesting that different physical mechanisms are operating. In the western and south‐central U.S., as well as the Appalachians, velocity variations are large compared to attenuation changes, while the opposite is true in the north‐central and southeastern U.S. Calculations with the Very Broadband Rheology calculator show that these results are consistent with the main source of heterogeneity being temperature and melt fraction in the former regions and grain size variability in the latter ones.

     
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2024
  3. Score matching is an alternative to maximum likelihood (ML) for estimating a probability distribution parametrized up to a constant of proportionality. By fitting the ''score'' of the distribution, it sidesteps the need to compute this constant of proportionality (which is often intractable). While score matching and variants thereof are popular in practice, precise theoretical understanding of the benefits and tradeoffs with maximum likelihood---both computational and statistical---are not well understood. In this work, we give the first example of a natural exponential family of distributions such that the score matching loss is computationally efficient to optimize, and has a comparable statistical efficiency to ML, while the ML loss is intractable to optimize using a gradient-based method. The family consists of exponentials of polynomials of fixed degree, and our result can be viewed as a continuous analogue of recent developments in the discrete setting. Precisely, we show: (1) Designing a zeroth-order or first-order oracle for optimizing the maximum likelihood loss is NP-hard. (2) Maximum likelihood has a statistical efficiency polynomial in the ambient dimension and the radius of the parameters of the family. (3) Minimizing the score matching loss is both computationally and statistically efficient, with complexity polynomial in the ambient dimension. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 10, 2024
  4. Abstract

    We present a comprehensive study of the nonproportionality of NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors within the context of dark matter search experiments. Our investigation, which integrates COSINE-100 data with supplementary$$\gamma $$γspectroscopy, measures light yields across diverse energy levels from full-energy$$\gamma $$γpeaks produced by the decays of various isotopes. These$$\gamma $$γpeaks of interest were produced by decays supported by both long and short-lived isotopes. Analyzing peaks from decays supported only by short-lived isotopes presented a unique challenge due to their limited statistics and overlapping energies, which was overcome by long-term data collection and a time-dependent analysis. A key achievement is the direct measurement of the 0.87 keV light yield, resulting from the cascade following electron capture decay of$$\mathrm {^{22}Na}$$22Nafrom internal contamination. This measurement, previously accessible only indirectly, deepens our understanding of NaI(Tl) scintillator behavior in the region of interest for dark matter searches. This study holds substantial implications for background modeling and the interpretation of dark matter signals in NaI(Tl) experiments.

     
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  5. We report on a total of 310 samples from marine sediments drilled in the Indian Ocean that were analyzed for glass shard compositions. Samples are mainly from International Ocean Discovery Program Expeditions 353 and 362 but are complemented by samples from Expedition 354; Ocean Drilling Program Legs 183, 121, 120, 119, 116, and 115; and Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 22. We performed 4327 successful single glass shard analyses with the electron microprobe for major element compositions and conducted 937 successful single analyses with laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) for trace element compositions on individual glass shards previously measured with the electron microprobe. In total, we were able to measure glass compositions for 254 samples. Of all the samples, 235 can be classified as tephra layers containing pyroclasts as the predominant component in their clast inventory between the 63 and 125 µm grain size fraction, often exceeding 90 vol%. The compositions of the Indian Ocean marine tephras range from basalt to rhyolite and from basaltic trachyandesite to trachyte and fall into the calc-alkaline, K-rich calc-alkaline, and shoshonitic magmatic series. 
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  6. Abstract Recent discoveries of water-rich Neptune-like exoplanets require a more detailed understanding of the phase diagram of H 2 O at pressure–temperature conditions relevant to their planetary interiors. The unusual non-dipolar magnetic fields of ice giant planets, produced by convecting liquid ionic water, are influenced by exotic high-pressure states of H 2 O—yet the structure of ice in this state is challenging to determine experimentally. Here we present X-ray diffraction evidence of a body-centered cubic (BCC) structured H 2 O ice at 200 GPa and ~ 5000 K, deemed ice XIX, using the X-ray Free Electron Laser of the Linac Coherent Light Source to probe the structure of the oxygen sub-lattice during dynamic compression. Although several cubic or orthorhombic structures have been predicted to be the stable structure at these conditions, we show this BCC ice phase is stable to multi-Mbar pressures and temperatures near the melt boundary. This suggests variable and increased electrical conductivity to greater depths in ice giant planets that may promote the generation of multipolar magnetic fields. 
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  7. Abstract

    Climatic drying is predicted for many tropical forests yet models remain poorly parameterized for these ecosystems, hampering predictions of forest‐climate interactions. We applied an integrated model–experiment approach, parameterizing an ecosystem model with tropical forest observational data and comparing model predictions to a field drying manipulation. We hypothesized that drying suppresses soil CO2fluxes (i.e., respiration) in relatively dry tropical forests but increases CO2fluxes in wetter tropical forests by alleviating anaerobiosis. We measured soil CO2fluxes during wet‐dry cycles from 2015 to 2022 in four Panamanian forests that vary in rainfall and soil fertility. Measured soil CO2fluxes declined in the dry season and peaked in the early wet season ahead of peak soil moisture, resulting in lower soil moisture optima for respiration than previously modeled. We then parameterized the model using field data and the new moisture‐respiration response functions. The updated model predicted increased soil CO2fluxes with drying in wetter and fertile forests and suppressed fluxes in drier, infertile forests. In contrast to model predictions, a chronic throughfall exclusion experiment initially suppressed soil respiration across forests, with sustained suppression for four years in the wettest forest only (−28% ± 4% during the dry season). In the fertile forest, drying eventually elevated CO2fluxes over this period (+75% ± 28% during the late wet season). The unexpected negative drying effect in the wettest, infertile forest could have resulted from reduced vertical flushing of nutrients into soils. Including hydro‐nutrient interactions in ecosystem models could improve predictions of tropical forest‐climate feedbacks.

     
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  8. Abstract

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most abundant elements on Earth, and it is the most widely used semiconductor. Despite extensive study, some properties of Si, such as its behaviour under dynamic compression, remain elusive. A detailed understanding of Si deformation is crucial for various fields, ranging from planetary science to materials design. Simulations suggest that in Si the shear stress generated during shock compression is released via a high-pressure phase transition, challenging the classical picture of relaxation via defect-mediated plasticity. However, direct evidence supporting either deformation mechanism remains elusive. Here, we use sub-picosecond, highly-monochromatic x-ray diffraction to study (100)-oriented single-crystal Si under laser-driven shock compression. We provide the first unambiguous, time-resolved picture of Si deformation at ultra-high strain rates, demonstrating the predicted shear release via phase transition. Our results resolve the longstanding controversy on silicon deformation and provide direct proof of strain rate-dependent deformation mechanisms in a non-metallic system.

     
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