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  1. Recently, there has been growing interest in developing the next-generation recommender systems (RSs) based on pretrained large language models (LLMs). However, the semantic gap between natural language and recommendation tasks is still not well addressed, leading to multiple issues such as spuriously correlated user/item descriptors, ineffective language modeling on user/item data, inefficient recommendations via auto-regression, etc. In this paper, we propose CLLM4Rec, the first generative RS that tightly integrates the LLM paradigm and ID paradigm of RSs, aiming to address the above challenges simultaneously. We first extend the vocabulary of pretrained LLMs with user/item ID tokens to faithfully model user/item collaborative and content semantics. Accordingly, a novel soft+hard prompting strategy is proposed to effectively learn user/item collaborative/content token embeddings via language modeling on RS-specific corpora, where each document is split into a prompt consisting of heterogeneous soft (user/item) tokens and hard (vocab) tokens and a main text consisting of homogeneous item tokens or vocab tokens to facilitate stable and effective language modeling. In addition, a novel mutual regularization strategy is introduced to encourage CLLM4Rec to capture recommendation-related information from noisy user/item content. Finally, we propose a novel recommendation-oriented finetuning strategy for CLLM4Rec, where an item prediction head with multinomial likelihood is added to the pretrained CLLM4Rec backbone to predict hold-out items based on soft+hard prompts established from masked user-item interaction history, where recommendations of multiple items can be generated efficiently without hallucination. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 13, 2025
  2. Personalized Federated Learning (PFL) relies on collective data knowledge to build customized models. However, non-IID data between clients poses significant challenges, as collaborating with clients who have diverse data distributions can harm local model performance, especially with limited training data. To address this issue, we propose FedACS, a new PFL algorithm with an Attention-based Client Selection mechanism. FedACS integrates an attention mechanism to enhance collaboration among clients with similar data distributions and mitigate the data scarcity issue. It prioritizes and allocates resources based on data similarity. We further establish the theoretical convergence behavior of FedACS. Experiments on CIFAR10 and FMNIST validate FedACS’s superiority, showcasing its potential to advance personalized federated learning. By tackling non-IID data challenges and data scarcity, FedACS offers promising advances in personalized federated learning. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 14, 2025
  3. The problem of few-shot graph classification targets at assigning class labels for graph samples, where only limited labeled graphs are provided for each class. To solve the problem brought by label scarcity, recent studies have proposed to adopt the prevalent few-shot learning framework to achieve fast adaptations to graph classes with limited labeled graphs. In particular, these studies typically propose to accumulate meta-knowledge across a large number of meta-training tasks, and then generalize such meta-knowledge to meta-test tasks sampled from a disjoint class set. Nevertheless, existing studies generally ignore the crucial task correlations among meta-training tasks and treat them independently. In fact, such task correlations can help promote the model generalization to meta-test tasks and result in better classification performance. On the other hand, it remains challenging to capture and utilize task correlations due to the complex components and interactions in meta-training tasks. To deal with this, we propose a novel few-shot graph classification framework FAITH to capture task correlations via learning a hierarchical task structure at different granularities. We further propose a task-specific classifier to incorporate the learned task correlations into the few-shot graph classification process. Moreover, we derive FAITH+, a variant of FAITH that can improve the sampling process for the hierarchical task structure. The extensive experiments on four prevalent graph datasets further demonstrate the superiority of FAITH and FAITH+ over other state-of-the-art baselines.

     
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 30, 2025
  4. Graph-structured data is ubiquitous among a plethora of real-world applications. However, as graph learning algorithms have been increasingly deployed to help decision-making, there has been rising societal concern in the bias these algorithms may exhibit. In certain high-stake decision-making scenarios, the decisions made may be life-changing for the involved individuals. Accordingly, abundant explorations have been made to mitigate the bias for graph learning algorithms in recent years. However, there still lacks a library to collectively consolidate existing debiasing techniques and help practitioners to easily perform bias mitigation for graph learning algorithms. In this paper, we present PyGDebias, an open-source Python library for bias mitigation in graph learning algorithms. As the first comprehensive library of its kind, PyGDebias covers 13 popular debiasing methods under common fairness notions together with 26 commonly used graph datasets. In addition, PyGDebias also comes with comprehensive performance benchmarks and well-documented API designs for both researchers and practitioners. To foster convenient accessibility, PyGDebias is released under a permissive BSD-license together with performance benchmarks, API documentation, and use examples at https://github.com/yushundong/PyGDebias. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 13, 2025
  5. The task of few-shot graph classification aims to assign class labels to graph samples, where only a limited number of labeled graphs are provided for each class. To deal with the problem brought about by label scarcity, recent works have focused on adopting the prevalent few-shot learning framework to ensure fast adaptations to classes with limited labeled graphs. In general, these studies propose to accumulate meta-knowledge across various base classes with sufficient labeled graphs, and then generalize such meta-knowledge to novel classes, which are disjoint from base classes and consist of limited labeled graphs. However, existing studies generally ignore the distinct distribution shifts between base classes and novel classes, leading to unsatisfactory adaptation performance. On the other hand, it remains challenging to address this issue due to the potential variance in distributions between classes. To tackle this problem, we propose a novel generative few-shot graph classification framework that can promote adaptation performance by generating adaptive structures for graphs in novel classes. Our framework incorporates a generative model to modify the graph structures for adaptation. We further conduct extensive experiments to validate the effectiveness of our framework. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available October 29, 2024
  6. Free, publicly-accessible full text available November 1, 2024
  7. Self-supervised learning with masked autoencoders has recently gained popularity for its ability to produce effective image or textual representations, which can be applied to various downstream tasks without retraining. However, we observe that the current masked autoencoder models lack good generalization ability on graph data. To tackle this issue, we propose a novel graph masked autoencoder framework called GiGaMAE. Different from existing masked autoencoders that learn node presentations by explicitly reconstructing the original graph components (e.g., features or edges), in this paper, we propose to collaboratively reconstruct informative and integrated latent embeddings. By considering embeddings encompassing graph topology and attribute information as reconstruction targets, our model could capture more generalized and comprehensive knowledge. Furthermore, we introduce a mutual information based reconstruction loss that enables the effective reconstruction of multiple targets. This learning objective allows us to differentiate between the exclusive knowledge learned from a single target and common knowledge shared by multiple targets. We evaluate our method on three downstream tasks with seven datasets as benchmarks. Extensive experiments demonstrate the superiority of GiGaMAE against state-of-the-art baselines. We hope our results will shed light on the design of foundation models on graph-structured data. Our code is available at: https://github.com/sycny/GiGaMAE. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available October 21, 2024
  8. Recently, there has been a growing interest in developing machine learning (ML) models that can promote fairness, i.e., eliminating biased predictions towards certain populations (e.g., individuals from a specific demographic group). Most existing works learn such models based on well-designed fairness constraints in optimization. Nevertheless, in many practical ML tasks, only very few labeled data samples can be collected, which can lead to inferior fairness performance. This is because existing fairness constraints are designed to restrict the prediction disparity among different sensitive groups, but with few samples, it becomes difficult to accurately measure the disparity, thus rendering ineffective fairness optimization. In this paper, we define the fairness-aware learning task with limited training samples as the fair few-shot learning problem. To deal with this problem, we devise a novel framework that accumulates fairness-aware knowledge across different meta-training tasks and then generalizes the learned knowledge to meta-test tasks. To compensate for insufficient training samples, we propose an essential strategy to select and leverage an auxiliary set for each meta-test task. These auxiliary sets contain several labeled training samples that can enhance the model performance regarding fairness in meta-test tasks, thereby allowing for the transfer of learned useful fairness-oriented knowledge to meta-test tasks. Furthermore, we conduct extensive experiments on three real-world datasets to validate the superiority of our framework against the state-of-the-art baselines. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available September 30, 2024
  9. In recent years, neural models have been repeatedly touted to exhibit state-of-the-art performance in recommendation. Nevertheless, multiple recent studies have revealed that the reported state-of-the-art results of many neural recommendation models cannot be reliably replicated. A primary reason is that existing evaluations are performed under various inconsistent protocols. Correspondingly, these replicability issues make it difficult to understand how much benefit we can actually gain from these neural models. It then becomes clear that a fair and comprehensive performance comparison between traditional and neural models is needed. Motivated by these issues, we perform a large-scale, systematic study to compare recent neural recommendation models against traditional ones in top-n recommendation from implicit data. We propose a set of evaluation strategies for measuring memorization performance, generalization performance, and subgroup-specific performance of recommendation models. We conduct extensive experiments with 13 popular recommendation models (including two neural models and 11 traditional ones as baselines) on nine commonly used datasets. Our experiments demonstrate that even with extensive hyper-parameter searches, neural models do not dominate traditional models in all aspects, e.g., they fare worse in terms of average HitRate. We further find that there are areas where neural models seem to outperform non-neural models, for example, in recommendation diversity and robustness between different subgroups of users and items. Our work illuminates the relative advantages and disadvantages of neural models in recommendation and is therefore an important step towards building better recommender systems. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 18, 2024