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  1. Stimulated Raman projection tomography is a label-free volumetric chemical imaging technology allowing three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of chemical distribution in a biological sample from the angle-dependent stimulated Raman scattering projection images. However, the projection image acquisition process requires rotating the sample contained in a capillary glass held by a complicated sample rotation stage, limiting the volumetric imaging speed, and inhibiting the study of living samples. Here, we report a tilt-angle stimulated Raman projection tomography (TSPRT) system which acquires angle-dependent projection images by utilizing tilt-angle beams to image the sample from different azimuth angles sequentially. The TSRPT system, which is free of sample rotation, enables rapid scanning of different views by a tailor-designed four-galvo-mirror scanning system. We present the design of the optical system, the theory, and calibration procedure for chemical tomographic reconstruction. 3D vibrational images of polystyrene beads and C. elegans are demonstrated in the C-H vibrational region.

  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 16, 2023
  3. For the past century, dislocations have been understood to be the carriers of plastic deformation in crystalline solids. However, their collective behavior is still poorly understood. Progress in understanding the collective behavior of dislocations has primarily come in one of two modes: the simulation of systems of interacting discrete dislocations and the treatment of density measures of varying complexity that are considered as continuum fields. A summary of contemporary models of continuum dislocation dynamics is presented. These include, in order of complexity, the two-dimensional statistical theory of dislocations, the field dislocation mechanics treating the total Kröner–Nye tensor, vector density approaches that treat geometrically necessary dislocations on each slip system of a crystal, and high-order theories that examine the effect of dislocation curvature and distribution over orientation. Each of theories contain common themes, including statistical closure of the kinetic dislocation transport equations and treatment of dislocation reactions such as junction formation. An emphasis is placed on how these common themes rely on closure relations obtained by analysis of discrete dislocation dynamics experiments. The outlook of these various continuum theories of dislocation motion is then discussed.