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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2023
  2. Abstract Two new high-entropy ceramics (HECs) in the weberite and fergusonite structures, along with the unexpected formation of ordered pyrochlore phases with ultrahigh-entropy compositions and an abrupt pyrochlore-weberite transition, are discovered in a 21-component oxide system. While the Gibbs phase rule allows 21 equilibrium phases, 9 out of the 13 compositions examined possess single HEC phases (with ultrahigh ideal configurational entropies: ∼2.7 k B per cation or higher on one sublattice in most cases). Notably, (15RE 1/15 )(Nb 1/2 Ta 1/2 )O 4 possess a single monoclinic fergusonite (C2/ c ) phase, and (15RE 1/15 ) 3 (Nb 1/2 Tamore »1/2 ) 1 O 7 form a single orthorhombic (C222 1 ) weberite phase, where 15RE 1/15 represents Sc 1/15 Y 1/15 La 1/15 Pr 1/15 Nd 1/15 Sm 1/15 Eu 1/15 Gd 1/15 Tb 1/15 Dy 1/15 Ho 1/15 Er 1/15 Tm 1/15 Yb 1/15 Lu 1/15 . Moreover, a series of eight (15RE 1/15 ) 2+ x (Ti 1/4 Zr 1/4 Ce 1/4 H 1/4 ) 2−2 x (Nb 1/2 Ta 1/2 ) x O 7 specimens all exhibit single phases, where a pyrochlore-weberite transition occurs within 0.75 < x < 0.8125. This cubic-to-orthorhombic transition does not change the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity appreciably, as the amorphous limit may have already been achieved in the ultrahigh-entropy 21-component oxides. These discoveries expand the diversity and complexity of HECs, towards many-component compositionally complex ceramics (CCCs) and ultrahigh-entropy ceramics.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023
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  4. A review highlights improvements in synthesizing and stabilizing multielement nanoparticles.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 8, 2023
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