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  1. Abstract Presenilin-1 (PS1) is the catalytic subunit of γ-secretase which cleaves within the transmembrane domain of over 150 peptide substrates. Dominant missense mutations in PS1 cause early-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD); however, the exact pathogenic mechanism remains unknown. Here we combined Gaussian accelerated molecular dynamics (GaMD) simulations and biochemical experiments to determine the effects of six representative PS1 FAD mutations (P117L, I143T, L166P, G384A, L435F, and L286V) on the enzyme-substrate interactions between γ-secretase and amyloid precursor protein (APP). Biochemical experiments showed that all six PS1 FAD mutations rendered γ-secretase less active for the endoproteolytic (ε) cleavage of APP. Distinct low-energy conformational states were identified from the free energy profiles of wildtype and PS1 FAD-mutant γ-secretase. The P117L and L286V FAD mutants could still sample the “Active” state for substrate cleavage, but with noticeably reduced conformational space compared with the wildtype. The other mutants hardly visited the “Active” state. The PS1 FAD mutants were found to reduce γ-secretase proteolytic activity by hindering APP residue L49 from proper orientation in the active site and/or disrupting the distance between the catalytic aspartates. Therefore, our findings provide mechanistic insights into how PS1 FAD mutations affect structural dynamics and enzyme-substrate interactions of γ-secretase and APP. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2024
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2024
  3. This work proposes a robotic pipeline for picking and constrained placement of objects without geometric shape priors. Compared to recent efforts developed for similar tasks, where every object was assumed to be novel, the proposed system recognizes previously manipulated objects and performs online model reconstruction and reuse. Over a lifelong manipulation process, the system keeps learning features of objects it has interacted with and updates their reconstructed models. Whenever an instance of a previously manipulated object reappears, the system aims to first recognize it and then register its previously reconstructed model given the current observation. This step greatly reduces object shape uncertainty allowing the system to even reason for parts of objects, which are currently not observable. This also results in better manipulation efficiency as it reduces the need for active perception of the target object during manipulation. To get a reusable reconstructed model, the proposed pipeline adopts: i) TSDF for object representation, and ii) a variant of the standard particle filter algorithm for pose estimation and tracking of the partial object model. Furthermore, an effective way to construct and maintain a dataset of manipulated objects is presented. A sequence of real-world manipulation experiments is performed. They show how future manipulation tasks become more effective and efficient by reusing reconstructed models of previously manipulated objects, which were generated during their prior manipulation, instead of treating objects as novel every time. 
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  4. Abstract Biomolecular recognition including binding of small molecules, peptides and proteins to their target receptors plays a key role in cellular function and has been targeted for therapeutic drug design. However, the high flexibility of biomolecules and slow binding and dissociation processes have presented challenges for computational modelling. Here, we review the challenges and computational approaches developed to characterise biomolecular binding, including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations (especially enhanced sampling) and machine learning. Further improvements are still needed in order to accurately and efficiently characterise binding structures, mechanisms, thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecules in the future. 
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