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  1. Abstract Continuous gravitational waves are nearly monochromatic signals emitted by asymmetries in rotating neutron stars. These signals have not yet been detected. Deep all-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars require significant computational expense. Deep searches for neutron stars in binary systems are even more expensive, but these targets are potentially more promising emitters, especially in the hundreds of Hertz region, where ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are most sensitive. We present here an all-sky search for continuous signals with frequency between 300 and 500 Hz, from neutron stars in binary systems with orbital periods between 15 and 60more »days and projected semimajor axes between 10 and 40 lt-s. This is the only binary search on Advanced LIGO data that probes this frequency range. Compared to previous results, our search is over an order of magnitude more sensitive. We do not detect any signals, but our results exclude plausible and unexplored neutron star configurations, for example, neutron stars with relative deformations greater than 3 × 10 −6 within 1 kpc from Earth and r -mode emission at the level of α ∼ a few 10 −4 within the same distance.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023
  2. Abstract We present results of a search for periodic gravitational wave signals with frequencies between 20 and 400 Hz from the neutron star in the supernova remnant G347.3-0.5 using LIGO O2 public data. The search is deployed on the volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, with thousands of participants donating compute cycles to make this endeavour possible. We find no significant signal candidate and set the most constraining upper limits to date on the amplitude of gravitational wave signals from the target, corresponding to deformations below 10 −6 in a large part of the band. At the frequency of best strain sensitivity,more »near 166 Hz, we set 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave intrinsic amplitude of h 0 90 % ≈ 7.0 × 10 − 26 . Over most of the frequency range our upper limits are a factor of 20 smaller than the indirect age-based upper limit.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  3. Abstract We present our current best estimate of the plausible observing scenarios for the Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo and KAGRA gravitational-wave detectors over the next several years, with the intention of providing information to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We estimate the sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals for the third (O3), fourth (O4) and fifth observing (O5) runs, including the planned upgrades of the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. We study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source for gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary systemsmore »of compact objects, that is binary neutron star, neutron star–black hole, and binary black hole systems. The ability to localize the sources is given as a sky-area probability, luminosity distance, and comoving volume. The median sky localization area (90% credible region) is expected to be a few hundreds of square degrees for all types of binary systems during O3 with the Advanced LIGO and Virgo (HLV) network. The median sky localization area will improve to a few tens of square degrees during O4 with the Advanced LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA (HLVK) network. During O3, the median localization volume (90% credible region) is expected to be on the order of $$10^{5}, 10^{6}, 10^{7}\mathrm {\ Mpc}^3$$ 10 5 , 10 6 , 10 7 Mpc 3 for binary neutron star, neutron star–black hole, and binary black hole systems, respectively. The localization volume in O4 is expected to be about a factor two smaller than in O3. We predict a detection count of $$1^{+12}_{-1}$$ 1 - 1 + 12 ( $$10^{+52}_{-10}$$ 10 - 10 + 52 ) for binary neutron star mergers, of $$0^{+19}_{-0}$$ 0 - 0 + 19 ( $$1^{+91}_{-1}$$ 1 - 1 + 91 ) for neutron star–black hole mergers, and $$17^{+22}_{-11}$$ 17 - 11 + 22 ( $$79^{+89}_{-44}$$ 79 - 44 + 89 ) for binary black hole mergers in a one-calendar-year observing run of the HLV network during O3 (HLVK network during O4). We evaluate sensitivity and localization expectations for unmodeled signal searches, including the search for intermediate mass black hole binary mergers.« less