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  1. Variable temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (VT-EPR) was used to investigate the role of the environment and oxidation states of several coordinated Eu compounds. We find that while Eu(III) chelating complexes are diamagnetic, simple chemical reduction results in the formation of paramagnetic species. In agreement with the distorted D3h symmetry of Eu molecular complexes investigated in this study, the EPR spectrum of reduced complexes showed axially symmetric signals (g⊥ = 2.001 and g∥ = 1.994) that were successfully simulated with two Eu isotopes with nuclear spin 5/2 (151Eu and 153Eu with 48% and 52% natural abundance, respectively) and nuclear g-factors 151Eu/153Eu = 2.27. Illumination of water-soluble complex Eu(dipic)3 at 4 K led to the ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) that resulted in the formation of Eu(II) in a rhombic environment (gx = 2.006, gy = 1.995, gz = 1.988). The existence of LMCT affects the luminescence of Eu(dipic)3, and pre-reduction of the complex to Eu(II)(dipic)3 reversibly reduces red luminescence with the appearance of a weak CT blue luminescence. Furthermore, encapsulation of a large portion of the dipic ligand with Cucurbit[7]uril, a pumpkin-shaped macrocycle, inhibited ligand-to-metal charge transfer, preventing the formation of Eu(II) upon illumination. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available August 14, 2024
  2. Abstract 167 Er 3+ doped solids are a promising platform for quantum technology due to erbium’s telecom C-band optical transition and its long hyperfine coherence times. We experimentally study the spin Hamiltonian and dynamics of 167 Er 3+ spins in Y 2 O 3 using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The anisotropic electron Zeeman, hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole matrices are fitted using data obtained by X-band (9.5 GHz) EPR spectroscopy. We perform pulsed EPR spectroscopy to measure spin relaxation time T 1 and coherence time T 2 for the 3 principal axes of an anisotropic g tensor. Long electronic spin coherence time up to 24.4 μ s is measured for lowest g transition at 4 K, exceeding previously reported values at much lower temperatures. Measurements of decoherence mechanism indicates T 2 limited by spectral diffusion and instantaneous diffusion. Long spin coherence times, along with a strong anisotropic hyperfine interaction makes 167 Er 3+ :Y 2 O 3 a rich system and an excellent candidate for spin-based quantum technologies. 
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  3. Abstract

    Electron spins in solid-state systems offer the promise of spin-based information processing devices. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), an all-carbon one-dimensional material whose spin-free environment and weak spin-orbit coupling promise long spin coherence times, offer a diverse degree of freedom for extended range of functionality not available to bulk systems. A key requirement limiting spin qubit implementation in SWCNTs is disciplined confinement of isolated spins. Here, we report the creation of highly confined electron spins in SWCNTs via a bottom-up approach. The record long coherence time of 8.2 µs and spin-lattice relaxation time of 13 ms of these electronic spin qubits allow demonstration of quantum control operation manifested as Rabi oscillation. Investigation of the decoherence mechanism reveals an intrinsic coherence time of tens of milliseconds. These findings evident that combining molecular approaches with inorganic crystalline systems provides a powerful route for reproducible and scalable quantum materials suitable for qubit applications.

     
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  6. Abstract

    Using high‐resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy‐loss spectroscopy, we show that beryllium oxide crystallizes in the planar hexagonal structure in a graphene liquid cell by a wet‐chemistry approach. These liquid cells can feature van‐der‐Waals pressures up to 1 GPa, producing a miniaturized high‐pressure container for the crystallization in solution. The thickness of as‐received crystals is beyond the thermodynamic ultra‐thin limit above which the wurtzite phase is energetically more favorable according to the theoretical prediction. The crystallization of the planar phase is ascribed to the near‐free‐standing condition afforded by the graphene surface. Our calculations show that the energy barrier of the phase transition is responsible for the observed thickness beyond the previously predicted limit. These findings open a new door for exploring aqueous‐solution approaches of more metal‐oxide semiconductors with exotic phase structures and properties in graphene‐encapsulated confined cells.

     
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  7. Abstract

    Using high‐resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy‐loss spectroscopy, we show that beryllium oxide crystallizes in the planar hexagonal structure in a graphene liquid cell by a wet‐chemistry approach. These liquid cells can feature van‐der‐Waals pressures up to 1 GPa, producing a miniaturized high‐pressure container for the crystallization in solution. The thickness of as‐received crystals is beyond the thermodynamic ultra‐thin limit above which the wurtzite phase is energetically more favorable according to the theoretical prediction. The crystallization of the planar phase is ascribed to the near‐free‐standing condition afforded by the graphene surface. Our calculations show that the energy barrier of the phase transition is responsible for the observed thickness beyond the previously predicted limit. These findings open a new door for exploring aqueous‐solution approaches of more metal‐oxide semiconductors with exotic phase structures and properties in graphene‐encapsulated confined cells.

     
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