skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Rering, Caitlin C"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. null (Ed.)
  2. Microbial metabolism can shape cues important for animal attraction in service-resource mutualisms. Resources are frequently colonized by microbial communities, but experimental assessment of animal-microbial interactions often focus on microbial monocultures. Such an approach likely fails to predict effects of microbial assemblages, as microbe-microbe interactions may affect in a non-additive manner microbial metabolism and resulting chemosensory cues. Here, we compared effects of microbial mono- and cocultures on growth of constituent microbes, volatile metabolite production, sugar catabolism, and effects on pollinator foraging across two nectar environments that differed in sugar concentration. Growth in co-culture decreased the abundance of the yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii, but not the bacterium Asaia astilbes. Volatile emissions differed significantly between microbial treatments and with nectar concentration, while sugar concentration was relatively similar among mono- and cocultures. Coculture volatile emission closely resembled an additive combination of monoculture volatiles. Despite differences in microbial growth and chemosensory cues, honey bee feeding did not differ between microbial monocultures and assemblages. Taken together, our results suggest that in some cases, chemical and ecological effects of microbial assemblages are largely predictable from those of component species, but caution that more work is necessary to predict under what circumstances non-additive effects are important. 
    more » « less