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  1. We propose a new approach for high resolution semantic image synthesis. It consists of one base image generator and multiple class-specific generators. The base generator generates high quality images based on a segmentation map. To further improve the quality of different objects, we create a bank of Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) by separately training class-specific models. This has several benefits including – dedicated weights for each class; centrally aligned data for each model; additional training data from other sources, potential of higher resolution and quality; and easy manipulation of a specific object in the scene. Experiments show that our approach can generate high quality images in high resolution while having flexibility of object-level control by using class-specific generators. Project page: https://yuheng-li.github.io/CollageGAN/
  2. Training generative models, such as GANs, on a target domain containing limited examples (e.g., 10) can easily result in overfitting. In this work, we seek to utilize a large source domain for pretraining and transfer the diversity information from source to target. We propose to preserve the relative similarities and differences between instances in the source via a novel cross-domain distance consistency loss. To further reduce overfitting, we present an anchor-based strategy to encourage different levels of realism over different regions in the latent space. With extensive results in both photorealistic and non-photorealistic domains, we demonstrate qualitatively and quantitatively that our few-shot model automatically discovers correspondences between source and target domains and generates more diverse and realistic images than previous methods.
  3. While it is nearly effortless for humans to quickly assess the perceptual similarity between two images, the underlying processes are thought to be quite complex. Despite this, the most widely used perceptual metrics today, such as PSNR and SSIM, are simple, shallow functions, and fail to account for many nuances of human perception. Recently, the deep learning community has found that features of the VGG network trained on ImageNet classification has been remarkably useful as a training loss for image synthesis. But how perceptual are these so-called "perceptual losses"? What elements are critical for their success? To answer these questions, we introduce a new dataset of human perceptual similarity judgments. We systematically evaluate deep features across different architectures and tasks and compare them with classic metrics. We find that deep features outperform all previous metrics by large margins on our dataset. More surprisingly, this result is not restricted to ImageNet-trained VGG features, but holds across different deep architectures and levels of supervision (supervised, self-supervised, or even unsupervised). Our results suggest that perceptual similarity is an emergent property shared across deep visual representations.