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  1. IEEE 802.15.4-based wireless sensor-actuator networks have been widely adopted by process industries in recent years because of their significant role in improving industrial efficiency and reducing operating costs. Today, industrial wireless sensor-actuator networks are becoming tremendously larger and more complex than before. However, a large, complex mesh network is hard to manage and inelastic to change once the network is deployed. In addition, flooding-based time synchronization and information dissemination introduce significant communication overhead to the network. More importantly, the deliveries of urgent and critical information such as emergency alarms suffer long delays, because those messages must go through the hop-by-hop transport. A promising solution to overcome those limitations is to enable the direct messaging from a long-range radio to an IEEE 802.15.4 radio. Then messages can be delivered to all field devices in a single-hop fashion. This article presents our study on enabling the cross-technology communication from LoRa to ZigBee using the energy emission of the LoRa radio as the carrier to deliver information. Experimental results show that our cross-technology communication approach provides reliable communication from LoRa to ZigBee with the throughput of up to 576.80 bps and the bit error rate of up to 5.23% in the 2.4 GHz band. 
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    Low-power wireless mesh networks (LPWMNs) have been widely used in wireless monitoring and control applications. Although LPWMNs work satisfactorily most of the time thanks to decades of research, they are often complex, inelastic to change, and difficult to manage once the networks are deployed. Moreover, the deliveries of control commands, especially those carrying urgent information such as emergency alarms, suffer long delay, since the messages must go through the hop-by-hop transport. Recent studies show that adding low-power wide-area network radios such as LoRa onto the LPWMN devices (e.g., ZigBee) effectively overcomes the limitation. However, users have shown a marked reluctance to embrace the new heterogeneous communication approach because of the cost of hardware modification. In this article, we introduce LoRaBee, a novel LoRa to ZigBee cross-technology communication (CTC) approach, which leverages the energy emission in the Sub-1 GHz bands as the carrier to deliver information. Although LoRa and ZigBee adopt distinct modulation techniques, LoRaBee sends information from LoRa to ZigBee by putting specific bytes in the payload of legitimate LoRa packets. The bytes are selected such that the corresponding LoRa chirps can be recognized by the ZigBee devices through sampling the received signal strength. Experimental results show that our LoRaBee provides reliable CTC communication from LoRa to ZigBee with the throughput of up to 281.61 bps in the Sub-1 GHz bands. 
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  3. null (Ed.)
    As a leading industrial wireless standard, WirelessHART has been widely implemented to build wireless sensor-actuator networks (WSANs) in industrial facilities, such as oil refineries, chemical plants, and factories. For instance, 54,835 WSANs that implement the WirelessHART standard have been deployed globally by Emerson process management, a WirelessHART network supplier, to support process automation. While the existing research to improve industrial WSANs focuses mainly on enhancing network performance, the security aspects have not been given enough attention. We have identified a new threat to WirelessHART networks, namely smart selective jamming attacks, where the attacker first cracks the channel usage, routes, and parameter configuration of the victim network and then jams the transmissions of interest on their specific communication channels in their specific time slots, which makes the attacks energy efficient and hardly detectable. In this paper, we present this severe, stealthy threat by demonstrating the step-by-step attack process on a 50-node network that runs a publicly accessible WirelessHART implementation. Experimental results show that the smart selective jamming attacks significantly reduce the network reliability without triggering network updates. 
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