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Creators/Authors contains: "Smirnov, Dmitry"

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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 22, 2025
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 3, 2025
  3. Abstract

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have drawn immense interests in scientific and technological communities, owing to their extraordinary properties and their tunability by gating, proximity, strain and external fields. For electronic applications, an ideal 2D material would have high mobility, air stability, sizable band gap, and be compatible with large scale synthesis. Here we demonstrate air stable field effect transistors using atomically thin few-layer PdSe2sheets that are sandwiched between hexagonal BN (hBN), with large saturation current > 350 μA/μm, and high field effect mobilities of ~ 700 and 10,000 cm2/Vs at 300 K and 2 K, respectively. At low temperatures, magnetotransport studies reveal unique octets in quantum oscillations that persist at all densities, arising from 2-fold spin and 4-fold valley degeneracies, which can be broken by in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic fields toward quantum Hall spin and orbital ferromagnetism.

     
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  4. Abstract

    Topological surface-states can acquire an energy gap when time-reversal symmetry is broken by interfacing with a magnetic insulator. This gap has yet to be measured. Such topological-magnetic insulator heterostructures can host a quantized anomalous Hall effect and can allow the control of the magnetic state of the insulator in a spintronic device. In this work, we observe the energy gap of topological surface-states in proximity to a magnetic insulator using magnetooptical Landau level spectroscopy. We measure Pb1-xSnxSe–EuSe heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy exhibiting a record mobility and low Fermi energy. Through temperature dependent measurements and theoretical calculations, we show this gap is likely due to quantum confinement and conclude that the magnetic proximity effect is weak in this system. This weakness is disadvantageous for the realization of the quantum anomalous Hall effect, but favorable for spintronic devices which require the preservation of spin-momentum locking at the Fermi level.

     
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  5. Abstract

    Realizing a large Landég-factor of electrons in solid-state materials has long been thought of as a rewarding task as it can trigger abundant immediate applications in spintronics and quantum computing. Here, by using metamorphic InAsSb/InSb superlattices (SLs), we demonstrate an unprecedented high value ofg≈ 104, twice larger than that in bulk InSb, and fully spin-polarized states at low magnetic fields. In addition, we show that theg-factor can be tuned on demand from 20 to 110 via varying the SL period. The key ingredients of such a wide tunability are the wavefunction mixing and overlap between the electron and hole states, which have drawn little attention in prior studies. Our work not only establishes metamorphic InAsSb/InSb as a promising and competitive material platform for future quantum devices but also provides a new route towardg-factor engineering in semiconductor structures.

     
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  6. Abstract Light-emitting electronic devices are ubiquitous in key areas of current technology, such as data communications, solid-state lighting, displays, and optical interconnects. Controlling the spectrum of the emitted light electrically, by simply acting on the device bias conditions, is an important goal with potential technological repercussions. However, identifying a material platform enabling broad electrical tuning of the spectrum of electroluminescent devices remains challenging. Here, we propose light-emitting field-effect transistors based on van der Waals interfaces of atomically thin semiconductors as a promising class of devices to achieve this goal. We demonstrate that large spectral changes in room-temperature electroluminescence can be controlled both at the device assembly stage –by suitably selecting the material forming the interfaces– and on-chip, by changing the bias to modify the device operation point. Even though the precise relation between device bias and kinetics of the radiative transitions remains to be understood, our experiments show that the physical mechanism responsible for light emission is robust, making these devices compatible with simple large areas device production methods. 
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