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  1. null (Ed.)
    The primary noise sources of the vehicle are the engine, exhaust, aeroacoustic noise, and tire–pavement interaction. Noise generated by the first three factors can be reduced by replacing the combustion engine with an electric motor and optimizing aerodynamic design. Currently, a dominant noise within automobiles occurs from the tire–pavement interaction over a speed of 70–80 km/h. Most noise suppression efforts aim to use sound absorbers and cavity resonators to narrow the bandwidth of acoustic frequencies using foams. We demonstrate a technique utilizing acoustic metasurfaces (AMSes) with high reflective characteristics using relatively lightweight materials for noise reduction without any change in mechanical strength or weight of the tire. A simple technique is demonstrated that utilizes acoustic metalayers with high reflective characteristics using relatively lightweight materials for noise reduction without any change in mechanical strength or weight of the tire. The proposed design can significantly reduce the noise arising from tire–pavement interaction over a broadband of acoustic frequencies under 1000 Hz and over a wide range of vehicle speeds using a negative effective dynamic mass density approach. The experiment demonstrated that the sound transmission loss of AMSes is 2–5 dB larger than the acoustic foam near the cavity mode, at 200–300 Hz. The proposed approach can be extended to the generalized area of acoustic and vibration isolation. 
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  2. Abstract

    Linear spreading of a wave packet or a Gaussian beam is a fundamental effect known in evolution of quantum state and propagation of optical/acoustic beams. The rate of spreading is determined by the diffraction coefficientDwhich is proportional to the curvature of the isofrequency surface. Here, we analyzed dispersion of sound in a solid-fluid layered structure and found a flex point on the isofrequency curve whereDvanishes for given direction of propagation and frequency. Nonspreading propagation is experimentally observed in a water steel lattice of 75 periods (~1 meter long) and occurs in the regime of anomalous dispersion and strong acoustic anisotropy when the effective mass along periodicity is close to zero. Under these conditions the incoming beam experiences negative refraction of phase velocity leading to backward wave propagation. The observed effect is explained using a complete set of dynamical equations and our effective medium theory.

     
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